Thread: Halley - '17 WK2 Trailhawk Overland Build

  1. #131
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    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2180miles View Post
    Thanks for the compliment!

    Curb weight: 4,869 lbs - per Jeep
    GVWR: 6,500 lbs

    I don't actually know what our loaded weight was for the Trans-Canada trip, but now that you mention it I'd be interested to know. I can account for 275 lbs between myself and Dani, 3x Pelicans around 40 lbs each, the Dometic CFX-35 loaded is probably around 35 lbs. The winch set-up is probably 70lbs, LED bar a negligible 5 lbs. Now you've got me wondering... I might have to take a trip to a scale with us loaded to find out. IMHO we should have plenty of wiggle room to go.
    It would be great to know weight over each axle, if you have a axle split scale available... truck stops typically have them...

    Full of fuel, water, etc..

    It’s not like their is some magical line in the sand where the vehicle breaks if over gvwr... but it would be good info to know...

    Fully loaded, How does it handle? Brake , steer? Handle rough fire roads? etc...

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl13 View Post
    It would be great to know weight over each axle, if you have a axle split scale available... truck stops typically have them...

    Full of fuel, water, etc..

    It’s not like their is some magical line in the sand where the vehicle breaks if over gvwr... but it would be good info to know...

    Fully loaded, How does it handle? Brake , steer? Handle rough fire roads? etc...

    Just asked a buddy who runs big rigs locally, he told me of a free scale about a half hour outside of town. It won't be for a few months until I can get out there loaded, but I'll add it to the white board list of things to do in the garage, as it definitely would be good to know.

    Re: handling... It was phenomenal. From the bumpy fire roads to crossing through rivers where bridges had washed out to flying (and I mean flying, 35-40+mph) through some sections of trail in Ontario's backcountry, to the miles of highway crossing Canada and the gravel roads in the National Parks, it was absolutely flawless. Braking was spot on, steering was a dream. I'm continually so incredibly impressed with this vehicle and its abilities off-road, especially when combined with its street manners. I'm a *German car guy so I have been fortunate enough to become accustomed to the way sport-tuned luxury sedans handle... steering on a dime that's relaxed in a parking lot but tightens down on the highway, suspension that makes highway off-ramps at double the speed limit feel like a roller coaster car on rails, etc. This WK2 is the perfect combination of a middle ground adventure-mobile while retaining the qualities of higher end vehicles that the "normal" SUV buyer for this caliber of transportation has come to expect.


    *this is not meant to be pompous, just giving my background.

  3. #133
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    And just to share, here's a quick end-of-year recap video I did of our adventures in the Trailhawk on the Trans-Canada Expedition...



  4. #134
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    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2180miles View Post
    Just asked a buddy who runs big rigs locally, he told me of a free scale about a half hour outside of town. It won't be for a few months until I can get out there loaded, but I'll add it to the white board list of things to do in the garage, as it definitely would be good to know.

    Re: handling... It was phenomenal. From the bumpy fire roads to crossing through rivers where bridges had washed out to flying (and I mean flying, 35-40+mph) through some sections of trail in Ontario's backcountry, to the miles of highway crossing Canada and the gravel roads in the National Parks, it was absolutely flawless. Braking was spot on, steering was a dream. I'm continually so incredibly impressed with this vehicle and its abilities off-road, especially when combined with its street manners. I'm a *German car guy so I have been fortunate enough to become accustomed to the way sport-tuned luxury sedans handle... steering on a dime that's relaxed in a parking lot but tightens down on the highway, suspension that makes highway off-ramps at double the speed limit feel like a roller coaster car on rails, etc. This WK2 is the perfect combination of a middle ground adventure-mobile while retaining the qualities of higher end vehicles that the "normal" SUV buyer for this caliber of transportation has come to expect.


    *this is not meant to be pompous, just giving my background.
    We just purchased a 2018 JGC overland... for my wife... and I agree completely about how impressed I am with the vehicle... so impressed, I am considering getting a second one for me... my only complaint... is that the the rough roads tend to transfer low frequency rumble into the cabin... I hope jeep works on that... and since I am a musician and sound engineer, I tend to notice that stuff acutely, so others may not notice as much...

    Looking forward to learn more about your rig... if you ever make your way down to Montana, outside of Yellowstone, we have a guest house with your name on it... thanks for sharing...

  5. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl13 View Post
    We just purchased a 2018 JGC overland... for my wife... and I agree completely about how impressed I am with the vehicle... and since I am a musician and sound engineer, I tend to notice that stuff acutely, so others may not notice as much...

    Looking forward to learn more about your rig... if you ever make your way down to Montana, outside of Yellowstone, we have a guest house with your name on it... thanks for sharing...
    Congrats on the new purchase, and I'm definitely behind you getting one for yourself! I can't say I've experienced the same issues with low freq. rumbles - also ironic, I'm a touring production audio engineer (mainly corporate/concerts) so I've got the same sensitivity and awareness for all kinds of sounds. Definitely appreciate the invite and we'll absolutely take you up on it. I'm looking at heading west to Colorado's Rockies as a potential destination for next summer so I'll keep you up to speed if we head further north through Wyoming at all... thanks again.

    Let me know if you end up with a WK2 of your own!

  6. #136
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    Got some new toys for the WK2 over Christmas... the weather lately in Boston has been frigid but installation should be happening soon.

    This is the Kenwood D-710G dual-bander with GPS/APRS and a buttload of other features. I chose the Diamond NR72B antenna for aesthetics and function, it's 14" tall and 1/4 wave. This is my first installed mobile rig so it may not be the world's best gear matching (mainly talking about the antenna) but the height was appealing and the range should still be suitable. Diamond shows 2.15dB gain on both 2m and 70cm. The mount is the ever-popular Diamond K400NMO with multi-axis tilting, and this will get mounted on the hood as there aren't many other places on the WK2 where there's enough folded metal to allow for a mount.

    More to come, but here's a kitchen-counter teaser shot.



    Kenwood D-710G Dual-Band Rig by 2180miles

  7. #137
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    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2180miles View Post
    Got some new toys for the WK2 over Christmas... the weather lately in Boston has been frigid but installation should be happening soon.

    This is the Kenwood D-710G dual-bander with GPS/APRS and a buttload of other features. I chose the Diamond NR72B antenna for aesthetics and function, it's 14" tall and 1/4 wave. This is my first installed mobile rig so it may not be the world's best gear matching (mainly talking about the antenna) but the height was appealing and the range should still be suitable. Diamond shows 2.15dB gain on both 2m and 70cm. The mount is the ever-popular Diamond K400NMO with multi-axis tilting, and this will get mounted on the hood as there aren't many other places on the WK2 where there's enough folded metal to allow for a mount.

    More to come, but here's a kitchen-counter teaser shot.



    Kenwood D-710G Dual-Band Rig by 2180miles
    What do you do with the HAM radio? Entertainment? I am a bit fascinated with them, but I have no idea what I would use one for....

  8. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl13 View Post
    What do you do with the HAM radio? Entertainment? I am a bit fascinated with them, but I have no idea what I would use one for....
    Easy question to answer... I was in your same shoes a year ago. Ham radio, or amateur radio, is basically walkie-talkies on steroids. The general idea of amateur radio is for users to communicate locally, regionally, globally, and even into space with radios in their homes, cars, and hands. There's a lot of weight behind the idea that in the event of a global or regional catastrophic problem (i.e. power grid failure, or something like an "apocalyptic" scenario) Ham radio will be the only way to communicate when cell towers and internet are down. A mobile unit like the Kenwood pictured above will broadcast up to 50w, where a handheld unit will broadcast around 5w. With these you can either broadcast "Simplex" or radio to radio, or using a "Repeater" which is basically a big antenna that takes smaller signals and rebroadcasts them at much higher wattages for much further ranges. For example, a repeater between us allows me to use my 5w handheld radio to talk to a friend 20 miles away... using Simplex, we may only get 3-4 miles. With a 50w rig I can hit a repeater MUCH further away and the power of that repeater would be able to broadcast me even further. In the end, instead of hitting 9 sq. miles, I could potentially hit 400 sq. miles thanks to the repeater (depending on its power).

    In overlanding, this allows two things. Primarily, the comms clarity is INFINITELY better than CB radio and walkie-talkies from Target. CBs are really crappy, but unfortunately the majority of the off-road parties use them still as they're easy to install. The issue is that most people don't tune antennas, and it's impossible to ensure each person has done a good job installing the unit and making it grounded appropriately for best level of functionality. The second thing it allows is a much larger range of communications. If I'm in the Rockies, instead of my CB hitting someone a mile away line of sight, I could hypothetically communicate to the other side of a distant mountain range, if there were a local repeater. Even Simplex would allow me to reach a further vehicle than CB.

    The downside, and the reason a lot of people don't jump into Ham, is that there's levels of testing and licensing required. I have my Technician license, the lowest on the 3-tier totem pole, and have been given the call sign "KC1HTW" by the FCC. The test isn't difficult, it's 35 questions from a ~450 question pool. The radios are a bit more expensive, but their abilities far surpass other more easily attainable modes of off-grid communication. One of the best features of this specific radio I have to install is the APRS feature, which basically allows the radio to communicate with digital repeaters and convey my call sign (assigned/programmed into the unit) back to multiple sources. One of those is a website, aprs.fi, where you can track call signs... I can also use the radio and these digital repeaters to send text and e-mails if necessary. This gives peace of mind to my girlfriend if I'm out of cell range for days on end, and is a great redundancy to the SOS abilities of my SPOT GPS - www.findmespot.com - which is nice. I live by the theory of two is one and one is none. (or, in digital media, "it doesn't exist until it exists three times").

    I'm by no means an amateur radio pro, so these answers are my own opinions from my own experiences, but hopefully that will give you an idea.

    There's also a massive network of amateur operators throughout the U.S. - just shy of a million, if I remember correctly - so you can usually find active repeater channels anywhere in the US and hear people chatting away about different subjects. I have friends who are a part of their local RACES, or Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services team, and have training in communicating on Ham radio during emergencies to help authorities.

    Anyway, that's my $0.02 on the subject! This Kenwood unit is going in the WK2 to improve the functionality of my radio comms set-ups, and to replace the handheld units I have been using this year, allowing them to become free to throw into my bug-out bag and to keep as spares in the Jeep's electronics Pelican kit.

  9. #139
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2180miles View Post
    Easy question to answer... I was in your same shoes a year ago. Ham radio, or amateur radio, is basically walkie-talkies on steroids. The general idea of amateur radio is for users to communicate locally, regionally, globally, and even into space with radios in their homes, cars, and hands. There's a lot of weight behind the idea that in the event of a global or regional catastrophic problem (i.e. power grid failure, or something like an "apocalyptic" scenario) Ham radio will be the only way to communicate when cell towers and internet are down. A mobile unit like the Kenwood pictured above will broadcast up to 50w, where a handheld unit will broadcast around 5w. With these you can either broadcast "Simplex" or radio to radio, or using a "Repeater" which is basically a big antenna that takes smaller signals and rebroadcasts them at much higher wattages for much further ranges. For example, a repeater between us allows me to use my 5w handheld radio to talk to a friend 20 miles away... using Simplex, we may only get 3-4 miles. With a 50w rig I can hit a repeater MUCH further away and the power of that repeater would be able to broadcast me even further. In the end, instead of hitting 9 sq. miles, I could potentially hit 400 sq. miles thanks to the repeater (depending on its power).

    In overlanding, this allows two things. Primarily, the comms clarity is INFINITELY better than CB radio and walkie-talkies from Target. CBs are really crappy, but unfortunately the majority of the off-road parties use them still as they're easy to install. The issue is that most people don't tune antennas, and it's impossible to ensure each person has done a good job installing the unit and making it grounded appropriately for best level of functionality. The second thing it allows is a much larger range of communications. If I'm in the Rockies, instead of my CB hitting someone a mile away line of sight, I could hypothetically communicate to the other side of a distant mountain range, if there were a local repeater. Even Simplex would allow me to reach a further vehicle than CB.

    The downside, and the reason a lot of people don't jump into Ham, is that there's levels of testing and licensing required. I have my Technician license, the lowest on the 3-tier totem pole, and have been given the call sign "KC1HTW" by the FCC. The test isn't difficult, it's 35 questions from a ~450 question pool. The radios are a bit more expensive, but their abilities far surpass other more easily attainable modes of off-grid communication. One of the best features of this specific radio I have to install is the APRS feature, which basically allows the radio to communicate with digital repeaters and convey my call sign (assigned/programmed into the unit) back to multiple sources. One of those is a website, aprs.fi, where you can track call signs... I can also use the radio and these digital repeaters to send text and e-mails if necessary. This gives peace of mind to my girlfriend if I'm out of cell range for days on end, and is a great redundancy to the SOS abilities of my SPOT GPS - www.findmespot.com - which is nice. I live by the theory of two is one and one is none. (or, in digital media, "it doesn't exist until it exists three times").

    I'm by no means an amateur radio pro, so these answers are my own opinions from my own experiences, but hopefully that will give you an idea.

    There's also a massive network of amateur operators throughout the U.S. - just shy of a million, if I remember correctly - so you can usually find active repeater channels anywhere in the US and hear people chatting away about different subjects. I have friends who are a part of their local RACES, or Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services team, and have training in communicating on Ham radio during emergencies to help authorities.

    Anyway, that's my $0.02 on the subject! This Kenwood unit is going in the WK2 to improve the functionality of my radio comms set-ups, and to replace the handheld units I have been using this year, allowing them to become free to throw into my bug-out bag and to keep as spares in the Jeep's electronics Pelican kit.
    Thanks, I went with sat based communication devices instead...

  10. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl13 View Post
    Thanks, I went with sat based communication devices instead...
    There are a lot of situations in which that makes sense (IMHO, communicating with home and emergency services) but do you have a plan for on-trail comms if you're wheeling in the backcountry with a convoy? Aka a more car to car comms system? This is primarily where CB and amateur (and GMRS/FRS walkies) come in.

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