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Thread: Dirt worthy wheel and tire options for heavier campers

  1. #1
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    Default Dirt worthy wheel and tire options for heavier campers

    I'm trying to figure out what wheel, tire and axle combination to go with on my new E450. I'm rated for 4600 pounds on the front axle and 9450 on the rear axle. Therefore, I'm looking for a tire and wheel combo rated for 4725 pounds. I can't imagine actually ever having that much weight over the rear axle, but legally I'd like to have a tire rated to match or exceed the data plate. I've been reading lots of threads on vans, F450 and F550 builds, ambulances etc. There's a recurring question in lots of them about what wheel and tire combo is that? I thought it would be worthwhile to have one thread where folks can cite examples they've seen or what they're using. Surplus military wheels, wildland firefighter trucks, conventional pickup truck tires etc. Many of us are also doing research on DRW to SRW conversions, and have questions on hubs and wheels. It seems that most of us want a tire that does 90% highway to get to the good stuff, then 8% dirt roads, and the rare 2% is a more gnarly trail to the actual campsite or beach.

    Untitled by Trevor Stellrecht, on Flickr
    Data plate by Trevor Stellrecht, on Flickr

    http://firematic.com/fireshop/store1...c.com/irok.htm



    Founders MT tires are designed and built for a specific purpose: To allow Ford F-550 and Dodge Ram 5500 trucks to maintain their intended GVW with a super single tire, while also providing superior longevity compared to any other tire its size. It features a tread design optimized for clearing mud/sand/snow while keeping enough rubber on the road to prevent overheating, wear, and blowouts that plague over-aggressive tread patterns. That makes these tires ideal for wildland fire fighting and rescue operations that require driving both on pavement and off-road. Use with super single wheels.

    Tire Size: 36x13.50-19.5
    Overall Diameter: 36.00"
    Cross Section: 13.50" (on a 9.75" Rim)
    Weight: 92 pounds
    Ply Rating: 16
    Load Range: H
    Max Load: 6400 pounds
    Max Pressure: 110 PSI
    Recommended Rim: 9.75"-11.25"
    Sidewall: 8 ply nylon
    Tread: 10 ply nylon.

    FMIFOUNDERS195
    $645.00
    Building a 1997 Ford E450 with 7.3 PSD and a 17' Grumman Olson box.

  2. #2
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    Continental MPT 81 - 275/80 R 20 - (10.5R20)



    The MPT 81 is the most common tire purchased for customers that spend a good amount of time on-road as well as off-road. These tires are quiet at speed, offer low rolling resistance, and do excellent in Sand, Snow, and the Rocks. In extreme mud the MPT 81 tends to have a hard time clearing itself and the MPT 80 is probably a better option. The MPT 81 is a direct competitor to the Michelin XZL.

    Height 37.4" Tall
    Width 10.43"
    Speed rated for 68 MPH
    Max load rating is 4674 Lbs at 77PSI.
    Preferred rim is 9" Wide.
    Building a 1997 Ford E450 with 7.3 PSD and a 17' Grumman Olson box.

  3. #3
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    G275MSA



    Better road performance and wear than the MPT81, but only available in 335/80R20 (41") or the larger 365/80R20.

    335/80R20
    Height: 41.4"
    Width: 13.1"
    Weight: 133
    Load:Highway 6,395 @ 80psi
    Rim: 9-11"

    365/80R20
    Height: 43.0"
    Width: 14.4"
    Weight: 162
    Load: Highway 8,270 @ 95psi
    Rim: 10-11"

    Max Speed: 81MPH for both

  4. #4
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    BFG AT KO2, same tires I have on my Motovan now that I'm really impressed with. They're available in a 295/75R16, 33.3" tall, 3,970 pound capacity. With a 5400 pound axle weight with just my XR650R in the back, that would give me an empty axle weight of about 5100 pounds. With those tires I would be limited to 7,940 on the rear axle for a useful load of 2,840 pounds. This would include everything for the build out and cargo. 2 bikes, batteries, water, cabinets, wiring etc.... That's 1,510 pounds below the axle weight rating, 755 pounds per tire. Maybe I can live with that?

    Also available, the BFG AT KO2 in a 315/75R16, 34.5" tall and a capacity of 3860 per tire and a 2,620 pound useful load.
    Building a 1997 Ford E450 with 7.3 PSD and a 17' Grumman Olson box.

  5. #5
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    Neil
    Member-161

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by njtacoma View Post
    Getting closer! But all the 18" and 20" sizes are still under 4k lb load rating sadly.

  7. #7
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    Toyo R/T in 285/75R18 is 34.8" tall and rated for 4080 pounds. 8160 for the axle, 1290 under the axle rating.
    Building a 1997 Ford E450 with 7.3 PSD and a 17' Grumman Olson box.

  8. #8
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    How many spares you plan to carry and availability in areas of travel are good things to consider in this decision too.

    That box is going to be really tall on 35-36" tires and a 6" lift....
    Quote Originally Posted by Jsweezy View Post
    You guys in Boise have all the cool vans...
    http://forum.expeditionportal.com/th...int-Conversion

  9. #9
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    Yes it's going to be very tall. I don't think I need to carry more than one spare.
    Building a 1997 Ford E450 with 7.3 PSD and a 17' Grumman Olson box.

  10. #10
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    My approach would be (and I have given it some thought because I want to do a cutaway chassis and custom box) to have the custom rear springs made to the final weight of the camper loaded with bikes and gear with a bit over.
    If you spring the truck for its total available GVW it will always ride harsh in the rear, won't articulate well, and will sway back and forth all over off road and on uneven surfaces.
    Using the "final total camper weight" approach allows you to use a smaller tire with a comfortable weight rating margin.
    You could estimate it? Or build it out first, and use lift blocks if going 4x4 before its complete, and buy/size springs at the end.
    Last edited by brian94ht; 08-09-2017 at 04:04 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jsweezy View Post
    You guys in Boise have all the cool vans...
    http://forum.expeditionportal.com/th...int-Conversion

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