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Thread: Front lower rearmost (frame) control arm bushing replacement question..

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    47

    Default Front lower rearmost (frame) control arm bushing replacement question..

    Hey all. So I'm neck deep in swapping out all four front control arms on my '98 Montero, 155k miles. This is my first go at any real suspension work. I ordered the complete arms from RockAuto, all AC Delco, to save some time vs bushing removal/install on my OEM arms. Convenience over cash as I'm new at this. So.. The rear bushings on the lower control arm are set into the frame. The factory service manual mentions a special tool for removal and recommends removing the differential carrier in order to remove the bushing on the driver side. These bushings don't look terrible and are rubber with a metal sleeve through center. First, did you guys swap these bushings or just the front bushing which is pressed into the lower control arm itself and came installed in the new AC Delco unit..? Should I just leave these lower rear bushings in the frame alone? If I do swap them, am I correct in assuming there is nothing magical about the Mitsubishi special tool and that I can just rent a universal bushing press from parts store? On the surface, removing the differential carrier to access the left side sounds a bit daunting... Whatcha think/experience? Thanks so much.
    1998 Gen 2.5, 155k miles, updating PO's 'deferred maintenance.'

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Dickson, TN
    Posts
    114
    1. I'd replace while you're that far in. Rubber wears with time and environment
    2. Just rent a parts store C-clamp press
    3. The carrier can stay in place. Yes it makes install and removal difficult but not nearly as difficult as moving the carrier

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Gilbert, Arizona
    Posts
    1,913
    I get them out with a C clamp and a small section of exhaust tubing (for the bushing to press into) with a little plate on it to clamp on. The driver side you can get the new bushing in just un bolting the rear most mount on the front diff.
    NEW! Mitsubishi 4WD Forum!

    1999 V45W Montero LWB 3.5 SOHC "Blizzard Package"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Michigan USA
    Posts
    404
    I couldn't get mine out. I was hitting them with a sledge hammer and had a clamp to help, no dice. A friend with experience said #1, a shop would use a hydraulic press to get mine out, #2, he wiggled them with a pry bar and said they felt tight. I gave up. It's the only thing I didn't replace up front, they are substantial enough that you probably don't need to. My truck took an alignment just fine in spite of that. If I could have gotten them out I would have replaced, but I have no regrets for giving up. I had 200k at the time.
    1998 Montero Gen 2.5 C

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    47
    Great advice, thank you all so much. I'll take a closer look and assess the rigidity with a pry bar or similar. I'll give it a shot if they're buggered, leave it alone if not.. I'd rather get them done as stated, I'm already this far into it. Wish me luck.
    Last edited by SlimPickins; 08-24-2017 at 05:12 AM. Reason: typo

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Arizona USA
    Posts
    351
    Purchasing all polyurethane bushings would have been cheaper than buying complete arm units. You will eventually have to replace the rubber ones you install in the next couple years, aftermarket rubber is junk and typically deteriorates in a short time. Just my advice, rebuild factory arms with poly, and never look back. Also, they can appear to be in good shape and seem tight, but when you put the weight of the front of the truck on them, there is alot more play than you think. My truck used to clunk when I would back down a driveway, once I did new bushings in the lower arms, that all went away and mine didn't appear bad at all when removing. I would definitely replace both lowers.

    Eitherway, those bushings are a booger, just curse at it a lot and pray to jesus. Boom!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    47
    Any tips on getting the new ones in? I bought OEM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Arizona USA
    Posts
    351
    C-clamp

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    oregon. split between east oregon desert, and the big muddy.
    Posts
    403
    big C clamps

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    oregon. split between east oregon desert, and the big muddy.
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    403
    ive done this job a hundred ways

    the method that works best for me (excepting leafspring bushings)
    is a socket the exact size of the bushing but slightly smaller than the hole, turned with the back of the socket toward the bushing
    another deep well socket on the other side of the frame hole slightly larger that the hole

    with razor knife and water trim carefully the old bushing so there is no bushing rubber protruding from its hole. this give the pushing socket a clear defined surface to push on
    run a long bolt or all thread through the whole mess.
    on the pushing socket i put a nut of the proper size for that socket in the socket to keep the threaded bolt/rod in one place. or if the center hole of the bushing is the right size I thread into that nut. hold the socket firmly with chain vise, vice grips , hand whatever and hit it with the burp gun
    or get a plate and put it over the socket so the nut you attach to the all thread will push on the outer edge of the socket.

    if you are a clever soul, do your work rightly and are accurate with your layout the socket will neatly push the old bushing out

    this never happens...
    or almost never.
    generally there is something misaligned or caddy - whompus and the business falls apart. eventually it will work- it must


    once you got her moving spray a bit of soapy water into the mess it will help things along.


    good luck
    save your swearing for golf.
    this is a machine and no matter how hard it resists its designed to comply, all the laws of physics and the finest engineering minds on the plante have teamed up to make this so.
    Golf , on the other hand is the spawn of the devil....
    satans pastime,
    lucifers pleasure.

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