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Thread: KLR as a true adventure bike?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    420 Farms
    Posts
    339
    The problem for me liking the KLR is that I've ridden with guys using them and seen the things that go wrong with them while out in the boondocks.
    Subframe bolts sheared leaving him stranded until we got it sorted out.
    The dreaded Doohickey, I've seen them go and it is not pretty.

    To me, there are much better bikes that cost about the same, the DR650 comes to mind.
    And if you load a KLR up, which you would do on a RTW tour, then it becomes really evident that it needs a lot of attention.
    Jay

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Biloxi, Mississippi
    Posts
    17
    JKAM makes another great point. Fortunately the subframe and doohickey are known issues that my research shows there are quality aftermarket fixes. However the question has to come into play as to how far does one go until they could have purchased a more expensive bike without the "knowns" for the same $$.

    But I still subscribe to simple is better theory.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    FoCo/Loveland
    Posts
    5,398
    I miss my KLR now. I think mcb2ms hits the point. Not perfect but it hasn't changed in so long that there is nothing that is not known about it and how to fix it. It's not sexy, it's kind of ugly, rough and I loved it. I think the reason all the fancy farkle doesn't exist for them is the owners are too cheap and prefer DIY solutions.

    I ran ammo can panniers for example that probably cost less than the locks on good luggage and a Twinheadlight Ernie rear deck. But I also never got the chance to drive around the world on mine so maybe they wouldn't have worked. They did the trick for overnights for me. Enough space inside for stuff that needed protection and a couple of dry bags strapped to the deck. Done and done.
    '08 Tacoma, some bicycles

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,352
    Quote Originally Posted by mcb2ms View Post
    JKAM makes another great point. Fortunately the subframe and doohickey are known issues that my research shows there are quality aftermarket fixes. However the question has to come into play as to how far does one go until they could have purchased a more expensive bike without the "knowns" for the same $$.

    But I still subscribe to simple is better theory.
    The thing is ALL bikes have known and unknown issues. BMW have final drive issues and fuel pump issues (and now fork stancion issue)
    KTM 950s had water pump issues and early 990s had issues with throttle dead spots. Buying a more expensive bike does not take away "issues" Far from it.

    The KLR is not represented by Kawasaki as anything more than it is. It became famous all on its own. With near zero marketing from Kawasaki.

    When was the last time you went to a Kawasaki ADV rally?

    My 990 had a bad dead spot. Im an ASE cert mechanic and did all diag and repaired it myself which involved a lot of work. The 990 is not all that simple, with twin tanks and a very high performance motor. Cost me time to repair it, but could you imagine a non mechanic paying to to have that work done? Cost a small fortune.

    However a KLR. My sisters kids could fix that bike.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    5,308
    A few years ago I had $6,000 burning a hole in my pocket and I couldn't decide if I wanted to buy a KLR, or a BMW 650 Dakar with the "uber reliable" Rotax engine. I got the latter with fewer than 8,000 miles. Within the next 3,000 miles the engine crapped out. Go figure.
    Bicycles rule.

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