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Thread: Expedition Vehicles: ridiculously overpriced or not

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSG View Post
    We need a "like" button around here!
    This is why I like my beat up Subaru. I dont worry about it parked at remote trail heads. My SLK 350 on the other hand gets very selective parking destinations cause people just screw with nice stuff or percieved weathy peoples junk. Even though mine was a barn find and cost less than the subaru

  2. #42
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    There will be a time, in the not too distant future, where the music will stop and some folks will be left standing... true some big rigs command a very high price at this moment...prices that are emotion driven and disconnected from the quality of the builds, and, at the next financial downturn, they will stop selling, used prices will plummet, as it has happened before... I don’t know when, but when emotion drives value, not quality, it is a house of cards...at some point, will crumble...

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl13 View Post
    There will be a time, in the not too distant future, where the music will stop and some folks will be left standing... true some big rigs command a very high price at this moment...prices that are emotion driven and disconnected from the quality of the builds, and, at the next financial downturn, they will stop selling, used prices will plummet, as it has happened before... I don’t know when, but when emotion drives value, not quality, it is a house of cards...at some point, will crumble...

    Unlike the unchecked funny money loan days today’s costly toys especially the odd ducks where loans are tough to start with are largely cash deals.

    The builders may fade away when spending stops, but there will be lots of interesting deals to be had when the next down turn happens. Money is both made and lost when the market has big corrections. When everyone was getting out in 07-08 some of us were going all in. It’s crazy my kids college fund started in 09 has been up over 63% yr after yr. But buying high priced stuff today is too rich for my blood. So as you say when the drop happens I might be shopping again. Though I’ll probably add another rental to my income generating program first😜

  4. #44
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    Cool A FEW THOUGHTS ON HIGH-END EXPEDITION VEHICLES

    In general, the maxim "You get what you pay for" is compatible with reality, although paying $12,000 for a Prada purse seems a bit… deranged. (I've never been able to find one that matches my 5.11 tactical pants, but maybe that's just me.)

    Regarding the high-end Expo rigs (Earthroamer, GXV, Action-Mobil, etc), I believe that the top-of-the line components they incorporate can justify their initial cost IF you have need of that level of mechanical competence: driving across Antarctica, spending a couple of years hanging out in Mongolia, commuting repeatedly on the San Diego Freeway…

    Necessary? No. I knew a guy who crossed the Sahara Desert several times in a garbage truck, and came out just fine, albeit a tad fragrant. So there you go.

    Considering these vehicles, one concern comes to mind. Depreciation: will an Earthroamer hold a large percentage of its initial value (cost) after, say, five years? I'm thinking it might, given that there appears to be an increasing demand for larger off road camperlike trucks. And assuming that the initial owners don't trash it. Having said that, allow me to provide a personal, similar example.

    A couple of years ago, my co-conspirator and I purchased a 1987 40 foot long, 500 horsepower Newell motorhome, in great shape, with 170,000 miles on it. Newells are all custom-built, and are about expensive a coach as you can get - everything is as high-end as one can find in a vehicle. The Newell we bought sold new in '87 for $400,000: mighty thin air at that altitude.

    BUT - we paid about eight cents on the dollar for this thing. Depreciation on RVs is unbelievable, which was great for us, and not so great for the seller. So I wouldn't be all that surprised to see used GXVs et.al going for less that astronomical prices after a few years of initial ownership. Upkeep is expensive on large complicated buildups, but I'm thinking that the desire (lust?) for them (for whatever reasons, rational or not) will propel a decent market in the next few decades, assuming that humanity doesn't come to a flaming and abrupt conclusion.
    Given all of that, you may still not be interested in a $500,000 off road Winnebago. In which case, I know where you could buy a good, used garbage truck with a terrific provenance for next to nothing...
    Live The Golden Rule (Or I'll Kill You)

  5. #45
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    I think initially, the high cost of a lot of high end products is R&D. Then making sure what you developed is a good product.
    In some cases that can be very expensive and time consuming.
    Getting your money back on these long and expensive projects can be tricky.
    If you can build up enough sales to offset some of the costs then you can keep the price lower.
    If you make custom, one off vehicles, that is hard to do.
    Jay

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobconroy View Post
    Would I choose an anemic, yet reliable Toyota engine or a Dodge diesel? Um...Toyota. We all know that the real trick is getting 4 wheel drive.
    That's why I'm building on a Tundra. 4wd is no problem and it certainly isn't anemic. The truck was only $31k new as well. It wouldn't be viable for someone who wanted to add a lot of weight, however.
    2016 Toyota Tundra SR 4x4 Double Cab Long Bed 5.7L..... DIY camper on the way...

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobconroy View Post
    These rigs are seriously overpriced, though someone must be paying for them. I would love to have a 4X4 overland camper van rig. I'd be willing to pay "retail" prices for one:

    New diesel extended van = $50,000 ?
    4X4 conversion = $5000.00 ?
    Cabinets, wheels, tires, appliances, suspension = $20,000 ?

    Total cost for new, reliable diesel 4X4 camper van with warranty = $75,000. And that is still A LOT OF $ for what you get, unless perhaps you are living in it for the next 10 years.

    Do we all believe that the shop monkeys that fabricate these vehicles make $100,000.00 each per annum? Get real. Someone is getting rich while paying $30.00 per hour for labor (at most).

    Explain why I'm wrong. To be fair, the average yearly income in my area is $25,000.00. We are "poor folks".
    You cant do a 4x4 conversion for $5000, a good used axle itself costs $1000 easy, then you have the 4x4 kit parts, springs, good shocks, transfer case, are you regearing [well there's more money to add in], adding lockers front and rear, labor if you're not doing it yourself. Try $10,000-$15,000 easy to do a very solid reliable 4x4 kit.
    Cabinetry, all depends if you start with cheapo particle board and staples like the crap Sportsmobile sells. Ask veteran Sportsmobile owners how many times they've had to fix cabinets flying apart. Its absurd how much they charge for crappy materials and door handles that came from grandmas 1970 home cabinets.
    The other gear depends on the quality, some deals out there on appliances.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe917 View Post
    There are people lined up right now to buy a phone for $1000 that is almost the same as the phone they bought last year! Go figure.
    I love this. Touche!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Peneumbra2
    Considering these vehicles, one concern comes to mind. Depreciation: will an Earthroamer hold a large percentage of its initial value (cost) after, say, five years? I'm thinking it might, given that there appears to be an increasing demand for larger off road camperlike trucks. And assuming that the initial owners don't trash it. Having said that, allow me to provide a personal, similar example.
    From the Earthroamer preowned site, since the wait list to build new is 9months or more, it appears that an owner can use theirs for a year or two and sell it for about what they paid for it, since there are people who want one[even used] now vs later. Similar with Sportsbmobile, can use a van for a year and sell it used for about the price of new to someone who no longer wants to wait for their new one to be built. Very strange but that's what these companies have built[demand] since theyre slow to build them, which increased demand further. Funny how that works.
    Last edited by torqluvas; 11-17-2017 at 06:23 PM.

  8. #48
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    I think you might be surprised in how much labor goes into a truck build. I wish I would have kept track of my time. I will be I have over 500 hours in mine easy.

    Add high end components and the price gets staggering quickly.

  9. #49
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  10. #50
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    Let this sink in for a moment:

    'As the year 2011 began on Jan. 1, the oldest members of the Baby Boom generation celebrated their 65th birthday. In fact, on that day, today, and for every day for the next 19 years, 10,000 baby boomers will reach age 65. The aging of this huge cohort of Americans (26% of the total U.S. population are Baby Boomers) will dramatically change the composition of the country.'

    Not all of these Boomers have the money to buy an ER, quite a few are having a hard time buying bread. However, as a Boomer myself, mid-range, late '50s, having owned a Winnebago Vecta, a truck camper, and now our Saurer 6dm, the competition for RV space, road space, and decent deals, is tight. Lots of money tied up in real estate, and as one person mentioned, the stock market. As Boomers retire, selling off that real estate, and investments, they're buying RVs, high-end RVs and other expensive toys. Plus, once they're done, the largest transfer of wealth in history will happen in the next 19 years. So, as the RV industry keeps up with the current demand, currently, older units will be on the market for cheap. Also, when one retires, health, followed by money, then age, are the three biggest reasons people keep or sell their stuff. Like that shiny new ER toy~! So, patience grasshopper, that 2006 ER with the crappy Ford diesel engine, will be a bargain! In 2026~!

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