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Thread: Putt Step Van Build

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    254
    Hearing you say your getting dust on back roads and looking back in your build it seems like
    its going to be a bear when you hit some of the desert/baja silt pits that you will run into with the door you have.
    The only recourse short term to close all your vents turn your heater to high vent to build as much pressure as possible.

    Another reason to have a good air compressor with a quick connect on rear bumper is to be able to blow silt off rear before you open door.

    I was lucky and had a van with 2 narrow doors that sealed up pretty good but always got dirt inside any way.

    Les,lqhikers
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  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by lqhikers View Post
    The only recourse short term to close all your vents turn your heater to high vent to build as much pressure as possible.
    Yep. That's why I say I'm going to reverse the flow on the fantastic fans and suck in air from above the vehicle to pressurize it.

    Another reason to have a good air compressor with a quick connect on rear bumper is to be able to blow silt off rear before you open door.
    Note to self: get a bigger compressor than you think.

    Man, that's a good lookin' step van.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Southern OH
    Posts
    727
    Maybe get a custom tarp you can Velcro in place when you know you will be in dusty places. Velcro it in from inside or outside...... whatever is easiest. I guess. If you use a rear ladder like the one lqhikers did.. maybe put it on barn door wheels somehow so you can roll it side to side to reach top portions of Velcro if you set to put the Tarp on the outside.
    Last edited by Coachgeo; 12-31-2017 at 03:11 AM.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    254
    Putts;
    Looking back on you build and reading about dust problems you said you plan on using
    roof vent/fan to build pressure.
    have you driven with vents open yet?all they do is flap and will soon crack.metal one are not
    quite as bad.

    Suggestion even though they add some height Max air covers do work you can leave vents open while
    driving and best when sleeping and the wind/rain blowing the flaping will not keep you awake.

    Just something to think about.

    Les,lqhikers

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    1,648

    Default Putt Step Van Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Putts View Post
    Yep. That's why I say I'm going to reverse the flow on the fantastic fans and suck in air from above the vehicle to pressurize it.
    This is one of the prime reasons I went with the Maxxair fan instead of the Fantastic fans. The Maxxair has a build in cover that can be open running down the road and has the ability to act as a pressurization fan.

    In the mining industry we use high volume pressurization fans to try to keep dust out of machines. Various levels of success.
    2007 Freightliner Dualcab Ambulance conversion. Check it out here
    FJ75 Landcruiser 6 wheeler (Converting to an AmboCamper)
    1963 BMW /2 with a Ural Sidecar.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by lqhikers View Post
    Just finished reading your build and will be following it tell your on the road, then i hope you keep us
    van lovers updated.
    I've had a lot of rigs and the only one i still miss is our 1972 chevy van.
    Don't worry about weight we put over 150 thousand miles on ours all over baja and mainland mexico
    loaded to the max with kayaks motorcycle zodiac with 20 hp outboard.2- 50 gal custom gas tanks.
    complete conversion, solar was not on the forefront like it is today went with propane.
    not to jump on your build but had to show you what we still miss, thank twice before you ever think about selling!

    Les,lqhikers
    I absolutely love when this rig gets brought up. It really is one of my all time favorite settups, and seems to have been used well!! Thank you for showing it.



    I removed my roll up door in favor of a half door and fixed wall. I hate dust getting in. I am almost finished it so no real world testing. The guy who runs Boomer the Camper Van had started a project for pressurizing his cabin, not sure of the outcome.

    Thanks Ross

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by lqhikers View Post
    Suggestion even though they add some height Max air covers do work you can leave vents open while
    driving and best when sleeping and the wind/rain blowing the flaping will not keep you awake.

    Just something to think about.
    Yeah, I have a plan. I'm actually going to put three very large solar panels on a rack that will end up above the vent by about eight inches. The vents will end up opening under the solar panels and be protected from wind and rain. The rack and panels will raise the overhead height about 10"-12", but that will still be less than vent covers, and the vent covers won't shade the solar panels. It's a little complicated to explain, but you'll see down the road when I install it.

    Quote Originally Posted by RC413 View Post
    I absolutely love when this rig gets brought up. It really is one of my all time favorite settups, and seems to have been used well!! Thank you for showing it.
    Me too.

    I removed my roll up door in favor of a half door and fixed wall. I hate dust getting in. I am almost finished it so no real world testing. The guy who runs Boomer the Camper Van had started a project for pressurizing his cabin, not sure of the outcome.
    I'll have to look that up. I can't run swinging doors as I'll have a motorcycle and a bunch of stuff on the rear bumper. Good luck on your seal!


    Been eyeball freezing cold up here in Montana, but I got some Putt stuff done.

    I was thinking it's time to put in the ceiling. I went for the easy one over the bed.



    Left side of the over-bed ceiling. The aluminum channel is glued to the ceiling plywood. Holes let you screw it into the wall and cabinet around the perimeter. This trim treatment is important for my future lighting. I will adhere LED RGBW (red green blue white) strips onto the top of the bottom leg of the C-channel; the other side of the black painted part. This is for my future indirect lighting system.



    After putting it in I realized ceilings aren't next...wiring is next. This back ceiling won't have a Phase 1 utility overhead light in it, but all the other ceiling panels will. As I looked forward in the cabin, I determined I had to do all the wiring before putting up the ceiling. Fine by me, I can just sit in my cozy, extension-cord electrically-heated cabin and solder stuff.

    Had to hook up the bus bars to the switches with a bunch of shorty little cables.



    The over-bed reading light and dinette table light will be wired to the "Courtesy Lights" circuit.

    Here's the bed reading light.



    Bunch of soldering and heat shrink---make sure you do them in the right order!



    Shortest run to power was up and over across to the right side and into the electronics cabinet.





    Here it's coming out of the wire conduits in the sidewalls into the electronic cabinet. (at bottom)



    It runs in parallel with the table light on the "Courtesy Light" circuit.



    Backside done.



    Splicing them all together was a pain in the butt. (See what I did there?)



    $1000 in the right crimping tools and connectors is probably the most high-reliability ways to go, but I've been soldering connections for a long time. It's what I know and am comfortable with. Old dogs and such. And cheap crimping tools and connectors is way less reliable.



    12 gauge wire is way overkill but I'm not going to lose energy to voltage drop if I can help it.

    All bundled up in heatshrink.



    Seriously, 12 gauge wire is ridiculous, but, other than needing more solder and heat, the mechanics performed to make the splice is the same as if it was 16 gauge. I figure if I just get used to doing splices and connectors with this heavy gauge, down the road I'll actually be saving quite a bit of juice on the voltage drop of thinner wire overall. In a 12 Volt system, conductor resistance counts.

    The cabin looks like an electronics repair station.


  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    50
    Nice. Got some hours in over the holidays. Wiring stuff up to the switch/fuse panels isn't all that photogenic, but it's what I've got.

    Six circuits are in. Take a look at that wiring harness. If I get up to the 24 circuit max, it's going to be as thick as my forearm.



    I love the bed reading light.



    If you touch and hold the control band it can vary the light intensity.

    It's also got a nightlight mode.



    The table lamp works the same.



    Also installed the kitchen lights under the cabinet.



    And a light for working on the electronics and checking the batteries.



    Then it was on to the ceiling.



    I can't fit a 4x8 sheet of plywood into Putt, so I had the folks at Home Depot do the major cuts. The knuckleheads were 1/4 inch off on one cut, and about 2 degrees off on another. Ergh.



    You can see the 1/4" gap up top. Oh well, some trim and weatherstripping around the edges and it'll be air tight...which it needs to be for my wall/ceiling venting system to work.

    All the ceiling panels up.



    Went through six 8-foot lengths of aluminum channel. Did a whole lot of this.



    Next up is installing all the trim pieces on the ceiling and gluing them into place...on one side only. I have to remove them all for paint, insulation, and light installation. They also have to be removable for when I install my indirect LED lighting in the channels and future maintenance.

    That's going to have to wait for a couple of weeks, I'm off to the consumer electronics show in Vegas on Wednesday....god I hate Vegas.

    Feels good to have the ceiling up though, so I've got that going for me.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    15
    "Which is nice". Looking great.
    2008 GMC 3500 Quigley 4x4 Savana Sportsmobile
    2006 BMW HP2 Enduro

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