Thread: Got rust? I do...and need your help!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Wherever my fatbike takes me...
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    Default Got rust? I do...and need your help!

    So I picked up an '02 Isuzu Trooper. Pretty clean for a Michigan rig. But...it's not without it's cancer spots. I'm wondering what - if anything - I can do to slow down the spread of this nasty rust cancer crap.

    I've got basic shop tools, can do some metal cutting and trimming, but any sort of fabrication, etc is past my abilities and I don't wanna spend hundreds / thousands on a rig that cost my $1800 to begin with!

    There's a few small spots along the rear door window but not worried about those right now. The rear doors on both passenger and drivers side are what I'm concerned about.

    Anyone got any suggestions how to slow this crap down?

    Thanks!
    AndyIMG_9582.jpgIMG_9581.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Fresno, CA
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    not much you can do. a small pressure pot style sandblaster will knock out the rust, but the only true way to fix it is learning to weld and do basic body work. the various chemical treatments, like POR 15 or Extends are best used after sandblasting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Illinois
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    The best way to get rid of rust is cut it out, grind it out and replace the metal. In your case look at POR15 products, they make some rust stopper, and top coat it with por paint, when done, get a couple cans of fluid film and soak everything under the truck down.
    2016 Ram 3500 Tradesman 4x4, CTD, Aisin, AEV, Warn 16.5, Carli Backcountry, Toyo, Factor 55, ARE topper, ETC.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Before you go to a lot of trouble, get underneath and make sure there is anything left of the frame...
    Steve Carlson
    1995 Isuzu Trooper LS - well equipped
    2010 Toyota FJ Cruiser, overlander in training

  5. #5
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    May 2011
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    Utah
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    For $1800 you could have found a rust free rig if you looked a bit harder/farther.
    1998 Montero with winter/locker package with Old Man Emu springs/torsion bars/shocks, ARB winch bumper, 33x10.50 km2's, aluminum roof rack with ARB awning

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Canada
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    Before painting with POR 15 get some Rust converter primer and spray that on all rust,,then scrape and wash clean..
    2008 Silverado 4.8 V8 ,air,,G80 locker,110.000km..homebuilt camper made of plywood and epoxy,.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    MA
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    There's no substitute for elbow grease. I don't have the tools/skills for metal work either, but managed to stave off rust on my '97 XJ that has lived in the northeast its whole life: rust spots above the windshield and along the drip-rail of the roof, mostly. I used fiberglass reinforced body filler and it's held up. Plan for a lot of prep and a dry, warm place to work on the issue over at least a couple days.

    Here's what I would do: First, remove all the trim near your rust, so you can see the whole area and none of the edges of the rust are hidden. Then hit it hard with a really stiff, wire hand-brush to remove any loose and flaky rust. That process will reveal what kind of holes in the body work that might be hidden and you can come up with a plan. If you have huge holes, there's no great solution except metal work, but if the holes aren't too big, you can repair them with body-filler. I used a fiberglass reinforced body filler called "Kitty Hair," by Evercoat. It's not as good as replacing it with metal, but its a simple process and works.

    Before doing any filler, you need to prep the material. After the hand-brush, I used a grinder with a wire-wheel to get the area as clear of rust as possible and then I used a liquid rust converter (Rust Seal, by SEM) to handle any residual rust in the nooks and crannies. Let that dry overnight and then you'll have a rust-free starting point for your filler. The rust converter can be primed and/or the body-filler will adhere to it.

    Two useful tips when applying the body-filler: 1) I used expanding foam to fill the area behind the hole that I needed to repair. The foam fills the cavity and then can be shaped (cut/sanded) to form the contours of the missing metal that you're replacing. This creates a backstop onto which you can easily apply the filler, rather than trying to get it to span a gap without any support. If you can find it, use a closed-cell foam (rather than open cell) because it won't soak up water. After the repair, remove whatever foam you can still get access to so it won't trap any water over time. 2) Once you spread the wet filler in place, immediately cover it with a sheet of wax paper while the filler is still malleable and use that wax-paper to evenly smear the filler into a uniform layer. Leave the wax-paper in place while the filler dries. The wax paper makes the process less messy, makes it easier to place the filler consistently and creates a smooth finished surface when the filler dries. I read about that trick on a forum and it works incredibly well and saves a ton of sanding effort later.

    After the filler dries, the wax-paper pulls right off. Do some finish sanding, fill in any bubble holes with more filler (let it dry again) and then apply a quality automotive primer to EVERYTHING the next day. After primer, you can finish paint it with whatever color you want. One last thing, read the primer directions closely: a lot of them instruct you to apply finish paint within a certain window of time, or you need to re-sand the primer again before finish paint.

    I have pictures of my process on this build thread, which might be helpful: http://forum.expeditionportal.com/th...sland-XJ-Build

    I had no experience with body-work but with some research and planning, I pulled it off satisfactorily. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Telluride, Colorado
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    I had some smaller issues that I addressed with a bedliner 'paint' job. I used rustoleum as my primer on bare metal. So far so good. I used the job as an opportunity to match my canopy, all in a two tone black and tan. I like it.

  9. #9
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    Awesome, thank you for the detailed reply!!! Gonna look into all your suggestions.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    yep got to get all the rust out, use a rust-inhibiting primer and then cover that up with POR-15. And if it is already rotten thru, seconding the advice to find a vehicle outside of the rust belt and do the work to 'rust proof' it as much as possible.
    My '02 Sub Build / Collection Topic
    Vortec and GMT800 Mechanical Stuff
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    Some of my Woodworking
    _______________________________________________
    '85 C-10, '05 k1500 Tahoe Z71, '02 k1500 Suburban Z71

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