Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread: Rio Grande Big Bend Exploration

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    109
    Big Bend is on my list for a trip. I love seeing your pics
    As a dreamer of dreams and a travelin' man,
    I have chalked up many a mile.
    Read dozens of books about heroes and crooks,
    And I've learned much from both of their styles.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    286
    Thanks for the nice replies.

    Big Bend is on my list for a trip.
    I've been considering another trip out to BBRSP in Feb
    Big Bend area is definitely on our "gotta get back there" list.

    I always like reading BBNP trip reports - my wife and I honeymooned there 40 years ago next June.
    Congrats! You have us beat by 6 yrs! There must be something in the Rio Grande water that keeps couples together :-) I imagine it's always a special place for return trips.
    -Dirk
    KG7IHT
    2005 Land Rover LR3. Locking rear diff, BFG ATKO's, ASFIR skid plates, Baja Rack, Yaesu 8800 HAM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    The Alleghenies
    Posts
    7
    Noticed all the power lines in the photo of the Boquillas main drag. Did they ever get power there? Years ago they were supposed to get power from the US side of the river but the tree huggers stopped it because I would ruin the "view shed".

    We spent more that a few Spring and Fall seasons in the Big bend area working on the river; mainly running Lower Canyon trips for 7 to 10 days. We actually lived in Boquillas for a while; part of the time down behind Jose Falcon's café or down over the hill behind the old cantina on the right as you walk up the road.

    Do they really have an "official" border crossing now?

    We have always loved the Big Bend country.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Markwell View Post
    Noticed all the power lines in the photo of the Boquillas main drag. Did they ever get power there? Years ago they were supposed to get power from the US side of the river but the tree huggers stopped it because I would ruin the "view shed".

    We spent more that a few Spring and Fall seasons in the Big bend area working on the river; mainly running Lower Canyon trips for 7 to 10 days. We actually lived in Boquillas for a while; part of the time down behind Jose Falcon's café or down over the hill behind the old cantina on the right as you walk up the road.

    Do they really have an "official" border crossing now?
    Wow, that sounds like great times, living and working there. I'm certainly no expert on the area, but I did a little bit of research before our trip. And when we went to Falcon's for lunch (because it looked warmer than the other restaurant), we were afraid they were closed because the door was shut and locked. But this was because they were full, and there isn't any standing room inside. A guy who seemed to be helping out explained that he'd give us a tour of Boquillas while waiting for a table to clear. Of course, this included a stop at his house, where we bought a few souvenirs, but the tour was informative.

    I'm pretty sure he said that the electric is from solar, and we did see a pretty good sized array of solar panels. He showed us the grade school and a couple churches. Provisions come by truck, twice weekly, from the nearest town in Mexico, which is over 100 units away (I forget if he said kilometers or miles). I had read about a firefighting crew from Boquillas that regularly crosses the border to help with fires in the national park, and asked him if he was part of that crew. He laughed and said that was work for the young guys.

    And yes, there is an official US border station. It's pretty low key. As we headed to Mexico, the guy reminded us that the station closes at 5. I started taking a photo my wife at the passport-reader kiosk, I was informed that photos aren't allowed. But you put your passport in the reader, and an offsite agent asks if you brought any fruit or other goods back from MX.
    -Dirk
    KG7IHT
    2005 Land Rover LR3. Locking rear diff, BFG ATKO's, ASFIR skid plates, Baja Rack, Yaesu 8800 HAM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    832

    Default Boquillas back-story

    My own research indicates the official border crossing closed soon after 9/11/01 and it re-opened in 2013. An acquaintance of mine who lives 30 miles outside of Terlingua, himself a self-taught off-the-grid living expert, was part of a grass-roots effort to build the solar system now providing electricity to Boquillas. If I ever get down there, Boquillas is high on my list of places to have a meal and dos cervezas, por favor.

    Foy

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    The Alleghenies
    Posts
    7
    I assume the Mexican border station in Boquillas is still not functioning.

    We chowed down at the school benefit barbecue one year. Barbecued goat (over an open fire and served from a galvanized wash tub), rice, tortillas and frijoles, with a Coke, for a $1.00 (actually, the Coke was an additional dime). The goat was outstanding!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    832
    Quote Originally Posted by Markwell View Post
    I assume the Mexican border station in Boquillas is still not functioning.

    We chowed down at the school benefit barbecue one year. Barbecued goat (over an open fire and served from a galvanized wash tub), rice, tortillas and frijoles, with a Coke, for a $1.00 (actually, the Coke was an additional dime). The goat was outstanding!
    I believe the village, Jose Falcons, or both have a Facebook page. Either there or somewhere else specific I read mention of visitors first checking in at the Mexican station.

    Foy

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    286
    Hi, there is a MX border station, but it was closed on the day we were there. I forget the clue(s), but it seemed like the normal state is closed.

    One of the initiating factors for our trip was a write-up in my alumni mag of a grad who is a ranger at BBNP and which describes a trip to Boquillas. Here's the link, for anyone interested in another article about the area: https://calvin.edu/publication/spark...15/borderlands
    I sent this link to my wife to get her interested in the trip, and it worked :-)
    -Dirk
    KG7IHT
    2005 Land Rover LR3. Locking rear diff, BFG ATKO's, ASFIR skid plates, Baja Rack, Yaesu 8800 HAM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    The Alleghenies
    Posts
    7
    Getting the wife interested in trips can be difficult. After many Spring trips thru the Lower Canyons, and coming home all tanned up, I finally convinced my wife to come to Big Bend with me for a couple of weeks and a long trip on the Rio. Normal temps in Late March/Early April had always been in the swimsuit range during the day on the river. For her first trip it snowed about half the time and she spent most of the time in a full wetsuit. Not a good thing!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •