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Thread: Build & Questions: 2012 Trek Mamba 29er

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpalump View Post
    I could not get my Fox Float forks to do anything right. I rode other bikes and found they all had the same problem. Way too plush. I bumped the nitrogen way up for the fix per advise of a downhill race guy. Did the same to the rear shock. Per factory specs I need to gain 150 pounds to be using that much pressure. Now it handles like its on rails and I did not need a new fork. It's really nice to be able to pound down hard on the front end in turns and have what feels like a dirt bike front end. Just sayin if you don't like them then it's more than OK to swing the pressure dramatically. King coil over shocks on desert trucks have a sticker that calls for 150 psi. Suspension tuners tune for 200 psi. Racers run 50-500 psi for the tweek.
    Very interesting. I gotta check my fork, but I believe its a spring rather than gas. I planned an early break-in ride in May, so hopefully I can work some kinks out.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central GA, USA
    Posts
    33
    My 920 is the first year model, so it's running Sram 2x10 gearing and bar end shifters. I typically use the larger chainring on roads and the smaller chainring for rough offroad, but having the lo-lo gears is valuable on a loaded touring bike. My trail bike (Fuel EX8) runs 2x10 as well, but I'm fat and slow and need that low gear on steep trails sometimes. On a pure trail bike I would consider 1x11 but I wouldn't go out of my way to get it. I'd run the factory stuff until you have to replace it for wear, then see what the difference in cost is.

    One of the things I preach to all our beginners is suspension adjustment. Know your shocks and take time to adjust the settings until you get it dialed the way you want. It can make the difference between an ok bike and a real trail burner. Keep a log and write down the settings and your reaction to them. When I find the pressures I like I write them on the bike near the shock fill so I don't forget them. Every one likes different things from shocks and no shock comes set for you from the factory. Even spring shocks can often swap springs, but I'm not sure they've made spring-only socks on non-walmart bikes in years. The Fuel is the nicest bike I've had, but I still swapped in larger spacers on both shocks to increase compression ramp at the end of travel, and I'm running well over recommended air pressure in front and rear, all because I'm a heavy, aggressive rider. On the other hand, if you aren't bottoming out your shock occasionally on aggressive terrain, then you've got it set TOO stiff and you aren't using all the suspension you have.
    1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee V8, 2" OME lift springs, Bilsteins, Discoverer AT3s, NP249 that still works

    "Pickups are a portable hole into which you can throw all your dreams and all your hopes and take them with you on an adventure." - J.G. Pasterjak

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraclyde View Post
    My 920 is the first year model, so it's running Sram 2x10 gearing and bar end shifters. I typically use the larger chainring on roads and the smaller chainring for rough offroad, but having the lo-lo gears is valuable on a loaded touring bike. My trail bike (Fuel EX8) runs 2x10 as well, but I'm fat and slow and need that low gear on steep trails sometimes. On a pure trail bike I would consider 1x11 but I wouldn't go out of my way to get it. I'd run the factory stuff until you have to replace it for wear, then see what the difference in cost is.

    One of the things I preach to all our beginners is suspension adjustment. Know your shocks and take time to adjust the settings until you get it dialed the way you want. It can make the difference between an ok bike and a real trail burner. Keep a log and write down the settings and your reaction to them. When I find the pressures I like I write them on the bike near the shock fill so I don't forget them. Every one likes different things from shocks and no shock comes set for you from the factory. Even spring shocks can often swap springs, but I'm not sure they've made spring-only socks on non-walmart bikes in years. The Fuel is the nicest bike I've had, but I still swapped in larger spacers on both shocks to increase compression ramp at the end of travel, and I'm running well over recommended air pressure in front and rear, all because I'm a heavy, aggressive rider. On the other hand, if you aren't bottoming out your shock occasionally on aggressive terrain, then you've got it set TOO stiff and you aren't using all the suspension you have.
    What great insight. Obviously pegged me proper as a beginner, so I appreciate it. I'll take some pictures and do research on my shock and goof around with it. Luckily, a friend gave me a shock pump a couple of years ago so I can throw that in my tool bag. I'll post up after some investigating this weekend.

    Thanks a million.

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