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Thread: Build & Questions: 2012 Trek Mamba 29er

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    120
    I just picked up a set of the redesigned Kona Wah Wah flats. http://cog.konaworld.com/the-brand-n...available-now/ Clipless vs. Flats is a personal decision. I run both, and decide based on terrain to be covered, length of the ride, and potential hike-a-bike. For this ride, I'd probably go clipless, based on the amount of climbing. Clipless allows me to do a 360 degree pedal stroke, which I find nice on sustained ups. However, I'm loving the Wah Wahs. Huge platform, and very nice pins. Plus, they're less than $50. My .02.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by jayspies View Post
    I just picked up a set of the redesigned Kona Wah Wah flats. http://cog.konaworld.com/the-brand-n...available-now/ Clipless vs. Flats is a personal decision. I run both, and decide based on terrain to be covered, length of the ride, and potential hike-a-bike. For this ride, I'd probably go clipless, based on the amount of climbing. Clipless allows me to do a 360 degree pedal stroke, which I find nice on sustained ups. However, I'm loving the Wah Wahs. Huge platform, and very nice pins. Plus, they're less than $50. My .02.
    Youíve given me a compelling argument for both. Ha. I enjoy clipless, but Iíve had bad a experience in muddy conditions. Iíll chew on the idea some more, as going clipless would mean Iím buying new shoes too.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central GA, USA
    Posts
    32
    I like flats when I'm easy cruising or commuting but clipless is the only way to go (IMHO) for longer or more technical trips. Mainly because the gain in efficiency and control. The downside is having to wear clipless shoes, but once you find a pair that's comfortable it's not that big a deal.

    Some clipless designs are more prone to mud issues than others. I ride Crank Brothers pedals and have always had good luck with them even though I'm a heavy, aggressive rider. They are almost impossible to clog with mud - always in and always out when I want to be. Seems like a lot of people have had issues with them but I never have.

    If you're in Florida, check out a guy called Single Track Samurai. He puts together a lot of bikepacking races and rides in north-central FL. Some of my friends here in GA ride with him and his crew a lot. Always good times.
    1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee V8, 2" OME lift springs, Bilsteins, Discoverer AT3s, NP249 that still works

    "Pickups are a portable hole into which you can throw all your dreams and all your hopes and take them with you on an adventure." - J.G. Pasterjak

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraclyde View Post
    I like flats when I'm easy cruising or commuting but clipless is the only way to go (IMHO) for longer or more technical trips. Mainly because the gain in efficiency and control. The downside is having to wear clipless shoes, but once you find a pair that's comfortable it's not that big a deal.

    Some clipless designs are more prone to mud issues than others. I ride Crank Brothers pedals and have always had good luck with them even though I'm a heavy, aggressive rider. They are almost impossible to clog with mud - always in and always out when I want to be. Seems like a lot of people have had issues with them but I never have.

    If you're in Florida, check out a guy called Single Track Samurai. He puts together a lot of bikepacking races and rides in north-central FL. Some of my friends here in GA ride with him and his crew a lot. Always good times.
    Thanks for the advice. I'm still batting back and forth between the two. I've ridden clipless on mtb in the past and currently ride them on my other bikes. Swaying the that way after sleeping on it a bit and then coming here to see your response as well....looking that way.

    I'll check him out. Unfortunately I'm about to move, so my time is finite here. I wish I had gotten into earlier, but I also got into spear fishing while I was here. Too many hobbies, not enough time and money. ha

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    199
    Jones 2.5 Aluminum H Loop Bar came in a couple days ago, so did the quick swap that night in the garage. Followed up the next day with a better picture. So far its a huge improvement on comfort, though I'm still getting used the control differences. Pretty sure I'll need to rerun cables/hoses and get a shorter stem, so I'm going to do some homework there with the bar bag I'm looking at (Ortlieb).










  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central GA, USA
    Posts
    32
    Looks good. I'm not a big fan but several of the guys I ride with swear by them. I'm running drop bars (Salsa Cowbells) on a rigid trek 920 right now. Not a fan of drops on a suspension bike though.

    My Rig:
    20180206_170346.jpg
    1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee V8, 2" OME lift springs, Bilsteins, Discoverer AT3s, NP249 that still works

    "Pickups are a portable hole into which you can throw all your dreams and all your hopes and take them with you on an adventure." - J.G. Pasterjak

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraclyde View Post
    Looks good. I'm not a big fan but several of the guys I ride with swear by them. I'm running drop bars (Salsa Cowbells) on a rigid trek 920 right now. Not a fan of drops on a suspension bike though.
    Looks great! I'm thinking that I'll build one that will have drops on it that will be less back country and more hybrid-ish later on. Didn't want to spring for a whole new bike when the hard tail was chilling in the garage doing nothing. I've identified a couple of forks to replace my suspension fork, but I'm guessing it'll be after I acquire storage solutions and a sleeping bag. More than likely won't convert it until after the first trip to see if I like it or not.

    I have really been eyeing that 920 though, but I was thinking of some smaller tires for longer road stints. How do you like it in the back country? What are you mostly riding on?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central GA, USA
    Posts
    32
    I love my 920. It's not great at really technical trail work (drop bars, bar end shifters, rigid, long wheel base) and it's not ideal for rifing road centuries (too inefficient) but it's awesome for anything in between. IT fits perfectly between my carbon road bike and my 5" dual suspension trail bike.

    I've got 2 wheel set ups that I can hot-swap depending on terrain. I've got the factory 29" wheels running Bontrager XR1 2.2" tires - small knob tread. I use these on pavement and groomed trails, and for commuting on sidewalks and they work better than I expected. I'll probably go to something like Scwalbe Big Apples when I wear these tires out to be even more road friendly, because I now have the rough country wheel set. The rough country wheels are a set of Stan's 27.5 x 28mm wheels I picked up cheap as OEM take-offs. I'm running 2.8" Terravail Cumberland Tough tires on them. These are perfect for the rough stuff. We ride a lot of WMA and Nat'l Forest roads that are big chunky, fist-sized gravel and very poorly kept (ruts, holes, washes, etc.) Not bad in sand pits, and they roll really well for what they are. They feel like putting the Jeep in 4-Lo. If you can keep turning the pedals, you can ride over anything.

    The factory says the biggest you can run on the 920 is 29x2.2 and that's true...sort of. The 27.5x2.8 just barely clear on the back. The front could go a little bigger. I'm running a fairly narrow rim at 28mm too, and that keeps the tire tucked in a little. In the lowest gear the chain drags the edge of the tire tread slightly.

    If I were packing over real singletrack trails I'd opt for a hardtail with a suspension fork. This bike was mainly built with commuting and the Cross Florida Individual Time Trial (CFITT) in mind...but I have yet to make it to CFITT with my friends.
    1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee V8, 2" OME lift springs, Bilsteins, Discoverer AT3s, NP249 that still works

    "Pickups are a portable hole into which you can throw all your dreams and all your hopes and take them with you on an adventure." - J.G. Pasterjak

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraclyde View Post
    I love my 920. It's not great at really technical trail work (drop bars, bar end shifters, rigid, long wheel base) and it's not ideal for rifing road centuries (too inefficient) but it's awesome for anything in between. IT fits perfectly between my carbon road bike and my 5" dual suspension trail bike.

    I've got 2 wheel set ups that I can hot-swap depending on terrain. I've got the factory 29" wheels running Bontrager XR1 2.2" tires - small knob tread. I use these on pavement and groomed trails, and for commuting on sidewalks and they work better than I expected. I'll probably go to something like Scwalbe Big Apples when I wear these tires out to be even more road friendly, because I now have the rough country wheel set. The rough country wheels are a set of Stan's 27.5 x 28mm wheels I picked up cheap as OEM take-offs. I'm running 2.8" Terravail Cumberland Tough tires on them. These are perfect for the rough stuff. We ride a lot of WMA and Nat'l Forest roads that are big chunky, fist-sized gravel and very poorly kept (ruts, holes, washes, etc.) Not bad in sand pits, and they roll really well for what they are. They feel like putting the Jeep in 4-Lo. If you can keep turning the pedals, you can ride over anything.

    The factory says the biggest you can run on the 920 is 29x2.2 and that's true...sort of. The 27.5x2.8 just barely clear on the back. The front could go a little bigger. I'm running a fairly narrow rim at 28mm too, and that keeps the tire tucked in a little. In the lowest gear the chain drags the edge of the tire tread slightly.

    If I were packing over real singletrack trails I'd opt for a hardtail with a suspension fork. This bike was mainly built with commuting and the Cross Florida Individual Time Trial (CFITT) in mind...but I have yet to make it to CFITT with my friends.
    Great feedback! Thank you very much. Based on what youíre saying, Iíll hold what I have for a few trips and feel it out before making a call on a fork. That way I can also see if Iím more for touring or keep beating down trails. Some trip reports make it hard to not build a fat bike with flats and disappear for a while.

    Does yours run the SLX single front 11-speed setup too? I was looking to convert mine for simplicity and gained room for rear tire. LBS quoted $350 for conversion, but Iím 99% sure I can do it myself if I can find the groupo for the right price.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,300
    I could not get my Fox Float forks to do anything right. I rode other bikes and found they all had the same problem. Way too plush. I bumped the nitrogen way up for the fix per advise of a downhill race guy. Did the same to the rear shock. Per factory specs I need to gain 150 pounds to be using that much pressure. Now it handles like its on rails and I did not need a new fork. It's really nice to be able to pound down hard on the front end in turns and have what feels like a dirt bike front end. Just sayin if you don't like them then it's more than OK to swing the pressure dramatically. King coil over shocks on desert trucks have a sticker that calls for 150 psi. Suspension tuners tune for 200 psi. Racers run 50-500 psi for the tweek.
    Arizona

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