7.3 question

Assuming it’s an automatic, consider putting a larger transmission cooler in it, along with a good transmission temp gauge. The weak link in the truck can be the transmission.

They’re good trucks that go a long time given proper preventive maintenance and upgrades.
 

glock7018

Member
I never claimed to decide what it was worth- I booked it, to find out what it's actual value is.

Book prices are based upon actual vehicle sales prices, not pie-in-the-sky wishful thinking Craigslist asking prices.

Asking prices have zero connection to actual vehicle value, and they also have zero connection to what they are actually selling for.

You are free to pay as much money as you want, above and beyond what a vehicle is actually worth.
I mean, its all about supply and demand determines what anything is worth. You can clutch to bluebook price all you want, but its the demand and dwindling supply is what is keep prices higher than book value. Book value doesn't determine what the truck is worth to you as a buyer. Its time consuming to find decent trucks so when one pops up that fits the criteria you are looking for, people are willing to pay what they think its worth to them.
 

DirtWhiskey

Western Dirt Rat
I drove my square body OBS 7.3 175k miles and sold it once none of the doors worked and all of the trim was falling apart. Engine was just warming up. Zero blow by and not a drop of oil leaking. Only changed the CPS sensor twice and wiring harness. Thing drove like a Cadillac and was extremely comfortable and reasonably quiet. Loved cruising at 85mph for hours on end. Drove way better than my 2011 Chevy 3500hd, which is the biggest turd I've ever owned.
 

Chorky

Observer
There are differences in opinions clearly in what vehicles should sell for. Though understandable that an old truck should not be worth over 10K, consider the fact that older trucks become more rare in good condition, therefore it does actually increase value. Like the old supply and demand statement. That is assuming a person will be willing to pay such a price of course. No demand, prices tank. These trucks are still of high value. Or consider for a moment a truck that was totally rebuilt - like mine. If I chose to sell for 50K, and someone bought it, then, well, thats the price. Maybe it's a rip off, maybe not, if a person considers al that is done to a vehicle - especially considering a new truck can go as high as 85K - which is insane being the same cost as my dads first house purchase. Same as a classic car, or an old Chevelle that I see selling for 110K fully rebuilt. This can be applied to houses. Is the value of a 1930's house truly 275K? not a freaking chance. Is the value of a newer house truly 750K for less than an acre of land? no way. But people are willing to pay the price, and that makes it impossible for others to even get started. Doesn't make it right, but thats what it is. Personally, I was glad to buy my truck at 9K 4 years ago. Primo condition (although old and needing 'normal' repairs). Now, having a new engine, new trans, new suspension, soon to be new paint, a bunch of goodies, it is easily worth well over 10K.




Got any more pictures? Interior? I think a 2" is a good plan. I did a 4, and now wish I could go to a 2, only it would cause rubbing issues.

Here we are,
So far all good. I think I might need to do the fuel injectors though.
I will start a build page for the truck, once I get it going.

Here is what I have ordered so far:

OME suspension kit 2" of lift and maintains factory rake.
New steering stabilizer.
New 17" wheels. I just don't love the American outlaw wheels
Warn hubs
I think I am going to go with 285/75/17 tire
Some fat mat for the hood and the doors, hopefully, quiet her down abit.
also going to do some preventative engine maintenance.
 

MTVR

Well-known member
When selling a house, you pull comps, which is sort of a manual way of "booking" your house, using ACTUAL sales prices. So yes, houses ARE worth what they are worth. And unlike consumer-grade vehicles, houses tend to appreciate.

Extremely rare vehicles with historical significance, do not get sold in numbers sufficient enough to develop a book value based upon other sales. Your $110K '68 Chevelle SS396 4-speed convertible in concours condition after a frame-off restoration, would be one example of this. The '63 VW bus that hammered for $198,000 in 2012 would be another one. As would the Ferrari 250 GTO that sold for 80 million a few years ago.

None of those vehicles has anything material in common with 20 year old consumer-grade used pickup trucks that get traded every day on the open market. There are fewer on the road today than there were 20 years ago, but Ford stamped out zillions of them, and there are still a LOT of them out there, getting bought and sold often enough to be able to develop book values for.

Book values do not exist in a vacuum- all of these excuses about "the market" being different than book values, is utter hogwash- book values ARE a composite report of what they are actually selling for. Asking prices in ads are meaningless, so using them to argue against an actual book value, is just silly.

Book values take into account vehicle year, make, model, trim level, cab, box, drive, engine, transmission, options, location, condition, and even paint color.

And consumer-grade vehicles almost always depreciate, but in the rare instance that actual sales prices go up, it would be reflected in rising book values.
 
Last edited:

Chorky

Observer
When selling a house, you pull comps, which is sort of a manual way of "booking" your house, using ACTUAL sales prices. So yes, houses ARE worth what they are worth. And unlike consumer-grade vehicles, houses tend to appreciate.

I 100% respectfully disagree. So there is a very real difference between book values and market. I suppose if you mean book values in discussing what historical records are then yes, that makes sense, but if you suggest using book values to set the price of something a person wants to sell as the end all be all, nah, I dont buy it. Nobody in their right mind can toy with the idea that a 100 year old house, with old, likely moldy insulation, poor insulation quality, led pipes, sub par oil heater, dangerous electrical, etc, could ever be randomly 'worth' more just because it is repainted and has pretty countertops. No way. Just fooling yourself. However, people totally get away with this because (for one theyre greedy) it is due to supply and demand. Economics drives it. It's not randomly worth more just because. By that measure, everything would be worth more as it ages, regardless of it's quality. If this is truly the case, then there is zero reason a dodge neon does not appreciate either. Just as with vehicles, houses need maintenance, upgrades, etc... The only difference is there is a higher demand for houses than vehicles. Additionally, who gets to decide what those 'book' values are? Just because someone says something, we should all just randomly agree? No thanks. If a person wants to sell something at an outrageously high, or low, price. And someone else buys it, it's fair. Both parties agree. Or, in some cases, many people choose to rent, or remain homeless, because they refuse to accept and agree (or just can't afford) a 50 year old double wide being 300K. So there is a very real difference between book values and market. How else can one explain a used early model earth roamer that is 10 years old with a half million miles selling for more than a house at the same cost of the original purchase 10 years earlier, or for that matter, a early 2000's ambo conversion which probably sold at an auction for less than 50K suddenly being priced out at nearly 200K.

So back to the example of the PO's truck he purchased - had it been rebuilt, new components, modified with high end lockers or some other sort of equipment (which is essentially the exact same as remodeling a bathroom or kitchen with 'custom' cabinets), ore even simply in excellent condition compared to others, then it in fact does drive up the selling price - because it is something other like trucks are not. Now, likely few people would be willing to purchase, so demand drives down the selling price if the seller chooses to accept that - however, if a buyer chooses to accept a higher price, well then its a different story. After all, many equipment additions, or even replacement components like engines or transmissions, do increase value. I think the bigger argument here is not what in is or is not, but what people are willing to accept or not accept. Which, is economics.
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
Here is a general response to a few of the posts.

First, Yes the truck is 17 yrs old, I know little things will go wrong. I am coming from driving lots of older Toyotas. IMO, this truck seems light yrs ahead of an 80' series Landcruiser. The beauty of these trucks, or an 80' series, 1st gen tacoma, 1st gen tundra, T100, is the platform. Very solid engines, that will 90% of the time, keep running. Yes, the components will become tired, but those are usually inexpensive fixes. I would rather do it this way than have a car 500-800 payment every month, just me.

Second, the other great thing about all of these vehicles is you can sell them for virtually what you pay for them. Buy a 7.3 with decent mileage drive it for a couple years and you can pretty much sell it for the same price. That has been my experience anyway. We can get annoyed by it or just accept it.

Its like whisky, you find one you like for a decent price and then all of sudden your favorite, (Elmer T. Lee) goes from 50 a bottle to 100. That's b/c they can only make so much and the supply starts getting lower. They are no longer making these vehicles, so they will only get more expensive as time goes on. Too bad you can't buy a case like you can with whisky.
 

MTVR

Well-known member
The reason you can sell 20 year old consumer-grade vehicles for as much as you paid for them, is because they have depreciated so much that it's just not possible for them to be worth much less.

And Elmer T. Lee isn't whisky. It's whiskey. Bourbon, to be exact. Laphroaig 25 is whisky. Single-malt Scotch, to be exact. It is a favorite of mine, but it's a heck of a lot more than $100 a bottle.

20200928_181539.jpg
 

ogre

Member
Here we are,
So far all good. I think I might need to do the fuel injectors though.
I will start a build page for the truck, once I get it going.

Here is what I have ordered so far:

OME suspension kit 2" of lift and maintains factory rake.
New steering stabilizer.
New 17" wheels. I just don't love the American outlaw wheels
Warn hubs
I think I am going to go with 285/75/17 tire
Some fat mat for the hood and the doors, hopefully, quiet her down abit.
also going to do some preventative engine maintenance.

View attachment 613239

Where did you get the OME suspension for your superduty??
I would like to look into it.

Looks like you got a solid truck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
Where did you get the OME suspension for your superduty??
I would like to look into it.

Looks like you got a solid truck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
believe it or not, I called ARB and they told me to contact 4wheel parts
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
The reason you can sell 20 year old consumer-grade vehicles for as much as you paid for them, is because they have depreciated so much that it's just not possible for them to be worth much less.

And Elmer T. Lee isn't whisky. It's whiskey. Bourbon, to be exact. Laphroaig 25 is whisky. Single-malt Scotch, to be exact. It is a favorite of mine, but it's a heck of a lot more than $100 a bottle.

View attachment 615038
the age-old scotch whisky debate. Yes you are technically correct Elmer t. Lee is bourbon. If I am drinking the Peaty stuff, I go for Auchentoshan and also alot more than $100.
 

MTVR

Well-known member
Auchentoshan is a Lowland, not an Islay. Which Auchentoshan are you saying is "Peaty stuff"?
 

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