Any Hindrances Because of the LR Defender's Unibody Design?

Humvee4us

Member
I've been seriously thinking about a Defender, the 90, because of its excellent approach, breakover, and departure angles. However, has anyone experienced any issues specifically related to the Defender being unibody rather than body on frame?
 

James86004

Expedition Leader
I've been seriously thinking about a Defender, the 90, because of its excellent approach, breakover, and departure angles. However, has anyone experienced any issues specifically related to the Defender being unibody rather than body on frame?
No issues for us in a year with our 110, and we have used it pretty hard. It is every bit as capable stock (except better tires) as our 92 Range Rover with a 2 inch lift, bigger tires, and aftermarket Quiafe diffs. It achieves that capability in different ways.

I heard the 2024 MY D90 has a much better rear seat layout that actually folds flat.

Sent from my moto g stylus 5G (2022) using Tapatalk
 

Humvee4us

Member
No issues for us in a year with our 110, and we have used it pretty hard. It is every bit as capable stock (except better tires) as our 92 Range Rover with a 2 inch lift, bigger tires, and aftermarket Quiafe diffs. It achieves that capability in different ways.

I heard the 2024 MY D90 has a much better rear seat layout that actually folds flat.

Sent from my moto g stylus 5G (2022) using Tapatalk
I'd heard that unibodies were very difficult to fix in case of a collision while body on frames were relatively easy, but having researched the subject it appears to be almost the same, a section has to be cutout and replaced, so I don't really see the difference there.
 

PhyrraM

Adventurer
I'd heard that unibodies were very difficult to fix in case of a collision while body on frames were relatively easy, but having researched the subject it appears to be almost the same, a section has to be cutout and replaced, so I don't really see the difference there.


I think what some may be referring to in that regard is not so much repair as options to keep it cheap....A unibody for the most part need to be repaired to fairly OEM spec. A body on frame could be repaired the same way OR by lopping the damaged bodywork off, bolting on something useful to cover any holes and calling it an upgrade or "clearance"...if one chooses to do so.
 

Humvee4us

Member
I think what some may be referring to in that regard is not so much repair as options to keep it cheap....A unibody for the most part need to be repaired to fairly OEM spec. A body on frame could be repaired the same way OR by lopping the damaged bodywork off, bolting on something useful to cover any holes and calling it an upgrade or "clearance"...if one chooses to do so.
Ah, that makes sense. No wonder I keep hearing it's easier and cheaper to repair if body on frame but to mee it seemed pretty much the same; but I was thinking actual OEM specs.
 

bri

Adventurer
I've been seriously thinking about a Defender, the 90, because of its excellent approach, breakover, and departure angles. However, has anyone experienced any issues specifically related to the Defender being unibody rather than body on frame?
Yes. Only what I have heard.

In collisions if unibodt is damaged. It can be totaled very quickly.
 

bri

Adventurer
No issues for us in a year with our 110, and we have used it pretty hard. It is every bit as capable stock (except better tires) as our 92 Range Rover with a 2 inch lift, bigger tires, and aftermarket Quiafe diffs. It achieves that capability in different ways.

I heard the 2024 MY D90 has a much better rear seat layout that actually folds flat.

Sent from my moto g stylus 5G (2022) using Tapatalk
No comparison. 92 has BW xfer case and is up to driver ability to determine its ability off road. New Defender will drive itself.

Thing is a 92 with 235/85R16 OME lift and no sway bars would likely get more places without damaging vehicle.
 

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