Making a Larger Off-Road(ish) enclosed trailer??

jagarcia89

Active member
Looking for ideas, guidance, or thought starters for making a larger slightly offroad capable tandem axle enclosed trailer in the 16-18ft range. I know it will never be a rock crawler and don't intend it to be. But I'd like to just get a bit more clearance because where I will be storing the trailer is on some mountain land I have in Colorado and the road will require a bit more ground clearance than a standard car hauler due to some water bars and occasional rocks.

My mindset and goals are as follows:
  1. Have a trailer the mentioned land to serve as storage/office and supply hauling while I build an off-grid cabin on the land.
  2. I would build modular "camper" pieces that could be put in an removed as needed or for different trips and strap them in where less offroad capability is needed or where I will maintain a sort of "home base"
  3. Eventually, I'd like to get a project car/utv built for just offroad use. Not sure yet, but long term I'd like something so I want a trailer large enough for a UTV, small jeep, samurai, or something else fun. Having the trailer now means I can jump on the right one when it comes up, vs having to factor in the car, a trailer, and the build
  4. I have a move coming up and having a big enclosed trailer will make it easier.
I came across these trailers from Colorado Trailers Inc that are pretty close to what I'd like to do, but not a fan of the price tag and would rather have a V-Nose. I just don't have much experience with trailers and don't know if it's as simple as just throwing some 32" tires on, or torsion vs leaf spring being the better starting point, or flipping axles to be under vs over leafs, etc...

1695329640440.png
 

LikeABoss

Observer
You can lift any of these trailers in some fashion fairly easily. Most have leaf springs and an axle flip or blocks if already axle under leaf is simple. Adding significantly bigger tires is the challenge due to the fenders or distance between axles. If you have the 7.5 wide with fenders completely outside the body, fenders are a matter of cutting, extending and welding. The space between axles is a problem if leaf sprung. The center is going to be an equalizer. You will need longer leafs and new outer mount points.

I think these mainstream “off road” enclosed trailers just put tires a couple years inches larger though and avoid all this I suspect but never looked that close.

I searched for a flatbed specifically with torsion axles that could be spread apart. Putting 37s on was a matter of fabricating new fenders.
 

LikeABoss

Observer
247ee43bfe05247da5d4f1fc1792d3e4.jpg
 

jagarcia89

Active member
You can lift any of these trailers in some fashion fairly easily. Most have leaf springs and an axle flip or blocks if already axle under leaf is simple. Adding significantly bigger tires is the challenge due to the fenders or distance between axles. If you have the 7.5 wide with fenders completely outside the body, fenders are a matter of cutting, extending and welding. The space between axles is a problem if leaf sprung. The center is going to be an equalizer. You will need longer leafs and new outer mount points.

I think these mainstream “off road” enclosed trailers just put tires a couple years inches larger though and avoid all this I suspect but never looked that close.

I searched for a flatbed specifically with torsion axles that could be spread apart. Putting 37s on was a matter of fabricating new fenders.
So did you just remount the torsion mounts further apart? Have any more detail or photos on what that looks like?
 

LikeABoss

Observer
The aluma might be unique in that the entire frame rail has a channel under it that the bolt can slide up and down the length of the trailer.

But the top of a torsion axle looks like this. If there wasn’t a channel, new holes could be drilled.

2a0c518634acac7966b792191cb6d812.jpg
 

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