New Isuzu FTR with Cummins

ScottReb

Adventurer
Ok, so who will be the first one to convert one to 4x4? Could realistically do it with 550/5500 running gear. Would only allow 19500 GVWR but that still gives an 11000 lb payload. Of course, you could spend more and do larger MDT axles and realize the full 26500.
Much bigger cab than the N series and an easily serviced, good-powered diesel.

What do y'all say??
 

mallthus

Pretty good at some stuff
Isuzu has already done it... it's called an FTS.
If you move to Australia you can get one straight from the dealer. :)

Which, of course, means that all the pertinent components are available from Isuzu…somewhere. Although I’m sure the components (and shipping from a market where they’re available) won’t be cheap, at least a conversion wouldn’t involve a ton of fabrication and re-engineering, although the difference in engines would likely be a complicating factor, not least because the 4HK1-TC in the FTR is physically smaller than and short on power compared to the 6HK1-TCC in the FTS.

The real question is then, when all is said and done, would such a conversion be cost competitive to and/or measurably superior to, say, a Navistar M2 (which is about as close as you can get to the FTS with a North American spec truck brand new in 2023, albeit not a COE)?

Not being a billionaire with limitless resources, the only argument besides “it’s cool” I can come up with for an FTR conversion is parts/service options if you’re doing a circumnavigation, as the M2 isn’t really widely available outside of North America (and not really available at all outside of the Americas, Australasia, and the Middle East).

It’d all be simpler if Isuzu would just sell the FTS in the North America. ?
 

kerry

Expedition Leader
Which, of course, means that all the pertinent components are available from Isuzu…somewhere. Although I’m sure the components (and shipping from a market where they’re available) won’t be cheap, at least a conversion wouldn’t involve a ton of fabrication and re-engineering, although the difference in engines would likely be a complicating factor, not least because the 4HK1-TC in the FTR is physically smaller than and short on power compared to the 6HK1-TCC in the FTS.

The real question is then, when all is said and done, would such a conversion be cost competitive to and/or measurably superior to, say, a Navistar M2 (which is about as close as you can get to the FTS with a North American spec truck brand new in 2023, albeit not a COE)?

Not being a billionaire with limitless resources, the only argument besides “it’s cool” I can come up with for an FTR conversion is parts/service options if you’re doing a circumnavigation, as the M2 isn’t really widely available outside of North America (and not really available at all outside of the Americas, Australasia, and the Middle East).

It’d all be simpler if Isuzu would just sell the FTS in the North America. ?
Why in the world doesn't Isuzu sell it here? I've never been able to figure that out.
 

Aussie Iron

Explorer
Buy a secondhand/wrecked one here in Australia, strip it out and send the parts to USA. Buy a 2WD in the States, use parts to convert to 4WD. You would then have the States - Chassis/ Vin Number. Problem is then solved -- Maybe.

Dan.
 

Ultimark

Active member
Why in the world doesn't Isuzu sell it here? I've never been able to figure that out.

I'm not entirely sure, but I'm of the belief that Isuzu don't manufacture any S vehicles in any other configuration than right hand drive (RHD); which is their domestic market situation. All of their 4x4 and 6x6 Isuzu trucks are only available in RHD countries to the best of my knowledge; although I could be wrong.

In Isuzu speak the three letters of each vehicle denote various things. With the NPS the first letter denotes the model which is N. The second letter denotes weight rating (and as far as I know the cabin configuration) P = wide cabin. The third letter denotes the drive-train layout. R = rear wheel drive, S = four wheel drive.

In case you're wondering, their C series of trucks, often marketed as Giga, have two model types. CVS = 4x4 and the bigger units CXW or CYW which are both 6x6 but different weight capacities.
 

kerry

Expedition Leader
I'm not entirely sure, but I'm of the belief that Isuzu don't manufacture any S vehicles in any other configuration than right hand drive (RHD); which is their domestic market situation. All of their 4x4 and 6x6 Isuzu trucks are only available in RHD countries to the best of my knowledge; although I could be wrong.

In Isuzu speak the three letters of each vehicle denote various things. With the NPS the first letter denotes the model which is N. The second letter denotes weight rating (and as far as I know the cabin configuration) P = wide cabin. The third letter denotes the drive-train layout. R = rear wheel drive, S = four wheel drive.

In case you're wondering, their C series of trucks, often marketed as Giga, have two model types. CVS = 4x4 and the bigger units CXW or CYW which are both 6x6 but different weight capacities.
Is it difficult to produce left hand drive 4x4's when they're already building left hand drive 2wd trucks? I don't know but in my ignorance my guess is not a whole lot of work. In the USA the FG was popular with landscapers in snow country who plowed in winter. Seems Isuzu could have a share of that market.
 

Ultimark

Active member
Is it difficult to produce left hand drive 4x4's when they're already building left hand drive 2wd trucks? I don't know but in my ignorance my guess is not a whole lot of work. In the USA the FG was popular with landscapers in snow country who plowed in winter. Seems Isuzu could have a share of that market.

You certainly have a reasonably valid point, but selling vehicles is primarily a numbers game; I'm not sure if the numbers are there for Isuzu to enter the 4x4 truck USA market and make money; which is the name of the game.

Similar issues happen in Australia, it is virtually impossible to purchase the big USA manufactured utes (pick-up) in Australia in a RHD platform. The Americans just don't do a RHD as it would be too expensive. The only way we can purchase these vehicles is to purchase one that has been converted in Australia from LHD to RHD and pay the funny money price.
 

SkiFreak

Crazy Person
Given that Fuso are no longer importing the 4x4 FG into the US, you would have to assume that there is a limited market there for that kind of vehicle.
 

ScottReb

Adventurer
We all talk about how great it would be to have this truck or that truck here, but we are a super small percentage of the population.
Isuzu NPR/NPS is the perfect example. EarthCruiser is selling the converted ones and I'm sure Isuzu USA is aware and they aren't scrambling to start importing NPS here. The market doesn't justify putting a few on a boat every year.
 

rruff

Explorer
The market doesn't justify putting a few on a boat every year.

Could be government regs for emissions and safety (and what else?), that make small volumes unprofitable. Just guessing. Hard to believe that 4WD in a truck like this would have weak demand. Plenty of places have crap winter weather... and then there is Canada. If they can sell them in a puny country like Australia...
 

SkiFreak

Crazy Person
If they can sell them in a puny country like Australia...
So funny...

As strange as it may seem, I have been informed that Australia has about 80% of the 4x4 light truck market globally!
Most are use for rural fire trucks and emergency services trucks. And then there are those idiots like us, that put habitats on the back. ;)
 

ScottReb

Adventurer
Shouldn't have any problems with safety and emissions when it's literally the same truck with a front drive axle. There are almost no MDT 4wd trucks. Not counting 550/5500 trucks.
Does International even offer it anymore on their bigger trucks? I can't believe several manufacturers are missing out on profits.
 

rruff

Explorer
So funny...As strange as it may seem, I have been informed that Australia has about 80% of the 4x4 light truck market globally!
Most are use for rural fire trucks and emergency services trucks. And then there are those idiots like us, that put habitats on the back. ;)

A country with 0.33% of the world population has 80%? There isn't even any snow there.
 

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