OVRLND CAMPERS ONLY : Post your OVRLND Camper build here or a link to your build thread to inspire others!

Ozarker

Pontoon Admiral
@dstefan you mentioned thermal bridging and I agree.

I choke, then laugh when DIY (or factory for that matter) builders begin talking about thermal bridging in a camper. Almost like talking a leak in a river and then saying the water level is rising!

I spent a few nights in an Army tent at -50 degrees and the tent poles touching the sides didn't make a flippin bit of a difference! At 115 degrees it didn't make any difference either. Just turn up the heater or turn down the AC. Yes, you can heat or cool down a tent.

If anyone is in any container, hut, dwelling, shelter or what have you, where 3 degrees difference on any structural part of it is actually critical, you're on the wrong planet.

If more thought were given to sizing a heater and an AC unit for an outdoor habitat, thermal bridging would only be a conversation among science geeks.
 

Double Down

New member
Same question - wondering what folks wish they would of done or something you realized you dont like after a few trips. I know someone mentioned earlier in the thread that dust buildup on the rear is bad due to the shape, does this regularly happen and is it enough to cover up windows in the bard doors? Current options I have on the build sheet are black skins, front cab slider window, bard doors with slider windows, driver side flip up hatch, awning prep on driver side, maxxfan plus, gas struts, vinyl windows, and PPV.

Also curious, has anyone done 3M thinsulate for insulation? It's a very popular option for van builds. Seems like thinsulate plus Low-E reflective foam core over top the aluminum framing would be great thermal bridge break - thoughts?
I did a similar build to yours but hatches on both sides - driver to the front and passenger to the rear. Works great for my bed setup and I couldn't imagine not having the hatches - so convenient to reach in and grab stuff!

I went the seemingly controversial route and got a flip up rear hatch vs barn doors. Standing on the tailgate with nothing above me was not a big draw for me, but having a "awning" over the back door when it's open was. Covers the tailgate in the sun and rain/snow and also one less door to close.

Definitely do the roof insulation/headliner. I finished insulated the walls recently and would have paid Jay $$ to do that for me as well - not hard to do just tedious. Working over your head on the roof would only make it worse. Money well spent in my opinion.
 
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Pra4sno

Member
My $.02 is:

1. Glad we got the hatches as we stand on the tailgate a lot. It's kind of our porch and nice to be able for me to stand up straight getting in and out. I'd hit my head a lot.
2. Barn doors on both sides. They will get a lot of use and aren't something that can be easily added in.
3. We got the rear cab slider and I am very happy we did. I can open it for fresh air pull through using the maxfann and it is out of the rain.
4. Did NOT get the rear hatch windows. I met with Jay when they were at ovrlnd expo and he explained that they aren't hard to add in later for someone who's a bit handy. I like that when the truck is closed up its private. In a 2nd gen Tundra I don't think I'd see much out of the back at all anyway. The camper doesn't obscure the door mirrors like the slide ins do, so our visibility out the back is great and we still have a backup camera for immediately behind the truck.
5. I insulated myself, it was easy and cheap and a good way to get to know how the camper was framed. I ordered a headliner from them though and would NOT try to make one myself - theirs is superior in every way to what I would have made. I used to design and build outdoor gear and have commercial sewing equipment and it would have taken me many iterations to have figured out the things they did in their headline that make it look so good.
6. We did exhaust only maxfann, which because of our slider window I think works great. If we didn't do the sliding window I get why intake would be important.
7. Added pin latches on the inside of the hatch windows. So nice to be able to lock the hatches from inside and open and close them at will. Very reasonably priced to have them welded but you could add them later.
 

Double Down

New member
My $.02 is:

1. Glad we got the hatches as we stand on the tailgate a lot. It's kind of our porch and nice to be able for me to stand up straight getting in and out. I'd hit my head a lot.

The flip up hatch is way more open/out of the way than you might think, you can stand on the tailgate easily with it open.

We all have our own needs/wants from our campers, but the limiting factor when getting in and out of the camper is the height of the actual camper rear opening and not what rear hatch design you chose.
 

Pra4sno

Member
The flip up hatch is way more open/out of the way than you might think, you can stand on the tailgate easily with it open.

We all have our own needs/wants from our campers, but the limiting factor when getting in and out of the camper is the height of the actual camper rear opening and not what rear hatch design you chose.

I was fortunate for an opportunity to compare directly 2nd Gen Tundra models with hatch vs barn doors in person prior to making our decision. I agree that each person has different needs and wants from the camper setup, I was sharing that we personally have liked the barn doors more for our use case. I think it matters, some may not.
 

montechie

Active member
Thanks for the idea. Will definitely check them out. I'm looking to build a minimal L shape bench like you mentioned. My 12 yr old gets the long bench and my 7 year can fit on the cab bench, will double as seating and storage.

That's only about four trips a year where I will have all four of us. There's going to be plenty of small weekend trips with just two of us. I foresee us bringing the gazelle tent and throwing the kids and the dog in there for trips where we're going to be at the same place multiple nights. Byeeeeeeeee


Big news! The big deposit is paid, and they are starting the manufacturing of my camper this week!

Here are most of the specs:

It's going on my first gen double cab Tundra 4x4. It's a 2006 and super clean. I sold my two-wheel drive Tacoma long bed for about the same price I bought this for a few months ago. Much roomier for the family, has 4x4, and a bigger bed (63w X 76L). Win-win all around.

- 11inch cabover, black anodized

- 70/30 ratio half barn doors, extra 2" of entry height. Slider window on the larger door (centered to truck), 80/20 on the smaller door.

- drive side flip up hatch, passenger side slider window (will have a dog crated in the bed during travel)

- Cabside slider window

- deluxe maxxair fan

- keder awning tracks on both sides, mounting a Kammock Crosswing awning on the rear.

- unistrut roof rails for occasionally hauling a canoe or paddle board, traction boards.

- headliner and insulation on ceiling

- had them cut off 6" from bed slide out length. Now it'll be 74", and I'll have more standing room.

- black Friday deals they ran... Free window, brake light, and clear plastic for the tent windows.

Decided not to get the lights ($$$ and I can do myself), solar gland (I have portable panels), daisy chain $$$.

I'm so stoked! They said should be ready in late February/early March.
That's a great idea to trim the slide out length, we could probably lose about 4" on ours, still fit our double megamat and give that much more standing room in our 5' truck bed.

Gen 1 Tundra + OVRLND is going to be a GREAT adventure rig.
 

montechie

Active member
I don't imagine there's a lot of silver Gen 3s w/ black OVRLND running around Bozeman. So...pretty certain that was you I honked at as I was turning at an intersection on my way to Safelite to replace a blown out rear passenger window :unsure: If you remember a big, green RAM loaded for bear, with a black OVRLND, turning right onto 161 while you were turning left in late August...that was us :cool:

Sorry to see you're having to sell :(
We should all really do an OVRLND meetup in Bozeman at some point. I'm the green/mud colored Gladiator with the silver OVRLND running around the Gallatin.
 

dstefan

Well-known member
I was fortunate for an opportunity to compare directly 2nd Gen Tundra models with hatch vs barn doors in person prior to making our decision. I agree that each person has different needs and wants from the camper setup, I was sharing that we personally have liked the barn doors more for our use case. I think it matters, some may not.
One thing I haven’t seen mentioned about Barn Doors vs Hatch is that the BDs have multiple other uses. We’ve found them useful as wind, and sun blocks. You can create a hold fast to keep them open in line with the N/S axis of the camper for visual and wind/sun blocks. We will drape a small tarp over one or both to create an extension down to the tailgate for that purpose. Real handy in organized campgrounds or blustery weather, where you don’t want/need to be cooped up inside fully closed. With an awning overhead you get an extended porch/room effect. Could also create a shower stall with a tarp and a temporary support over them, though we haven’t done that yet.

But the biggest advantage I’ve found is the ability to mount stuff on them, like a swing out on a bumper. We use ours for the Trasharoo, extra gas (up to 5 gals) and propane tank mounting when we’re too full inside.

Just some other things to consider.
 

montechie

Active member
Hey all - Not sure I've seen this question asked, but what - if anything - do you wish you had done differently? I am working through the build planning and selecting components right now. I have been really enjoying working with Maggie and reading this thread. Edit to add:
--The truck is a 2018 Tacoma, double cab long bed. Primarily use for weekend up to 2 week long trips. Currently have bed platform in ARE shell with a Topper EZ Lift.
--Mostly point-to-point camping to access harder to reach/more remote areas for climbing, caving, canyoneering, hunting, hiking etc.
--Main areas include the intermountain west and Southwest. I get out in a range of conditions - from hot (85-90++) and dry to ~10-20 deg F and raining/snowing lightly
--Won't be hauling a kayak or bike, most likely.
--I'm usually by myself or sometimes with my husband, no pets or kids.
--Currently planning on maxxair fan of some sort, positive pressure vent, barn doors with windows, driver side hatch with flip down inside counter
--Debating front (cab) window [might be nice for visibility and getting into rear seat]; anodized skin (black)
--Dithering over the DIY roof insulation and headliner or whether to have them install it

Thanks in advance.
Doesn't hurt to ask again so newer owners can chip in, there's some older responses as well to this question.

I think my responses are the same still, love my double hatches, double doors, my Terns, mostly the back windows. Terns are spendy, but really aid in year around secure venting/breathing/bug/warmth etc control in Montana, very adaptable and double paned. Not sure about the sliding front window, although as we're working on traveling with our cat, the sliding windows might be nice for him to move between the cab and camper.

Everyone uses theirs different. I would in no way want the taller cabover, although it would be more convenient for bedding storage (we can still store our winter bedding except our pillows). However, I run tight trails in the Jeep, and sometimes the tightness is from windfall over the trail. Every inch lower helps, but the Gladiator is a tall rig for a midsize. In a truck that I'm not pushing as much, not sure I'd care as much.

Haven't done a real heater yet, just a Mr Buddy + a 12v Ignik blanket as a pad. We're using wool insulation and it helps moderate the condensation from the Buddy well in the cold, very little droplets in the camper in the morning. We've slept down to the single digits, and I've worked in the back at -20F with a small 120v heater plugged into shore power to really see how things are, kept it at 50F, a real heater with a fan would have no problem. The thermal pack does make a big difference, it's all about dead air space. It probably is better at blocking heat in the summer. It also would be easy to upgrade with some Thinsulate and a sewing machine. Like others said, it's still a truck bed, I wish Jeep had gone with composite instead of steel in the bed, my bedmat makes a big difference at -20F for the feet. We hit -40 in Bozeman, had me wondering what the operating temp on the tent is...
 

jamiec

New member
Haven't done a real heater yet, just a Mr Buddy + a 12v Ignik blanket as a pad.
Great info, picking mine up tomorrow. In the winter its going to be my snowboard base, in Ca we rarely get temps below 10 F, planning a Buddy and electric just like you, good to know you have taken yours in much colder weather and been fine.
 

K9LTW

Active member
We should all really do an OVRLND meetup in Bozeman at some point. I'm the green/mud colored Gladiator with the silver OVRLND running around the Gallatin.

Happy to…should be maybe rolling around there at the end of May We’re out of Front Royal, VA.


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7000'Tundra

New member
Anyone have any tricks to keep the barn door latches from freezing up? At the end of a ski day, its a bummer to have to jimmy them around to get them open
 

Pra4sno

Member
Anyone have any tricks to keep the barn door latches from freezing up? At the end of a ski day, its a bummer to have to jimmy them around to get them open
shopping

This stuff works great!
 

dirtnsmores

Member
That's a great idea to trim the slide out length, we could probably lose about 4" on ours, still fit our double megamat and give that much more standing room in our 5' truck bed.

Gen 1 Tundra + OVRLND is going to be a GREAT adventure rig.
Yeah I got the idea from someone on the Facebook group. Picking up my camper in two weeks! Cannot wait. My truck is just about ready for it. Will be doing the rear suspension once I get the camper installed and save up a few thousand pennies

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