Spare / Extra Fuel - Worth Carrying? (East Coast)

SnoViking

Adventurer
Hey Folks, I'm trying to get some opinions and insights.

Is it worth the hassle of safely carrying and storing extra fuel (3-5 gallons) for exploring on the East Coast?

I ask because I am currently looking at getting a new fuel can. (I've used steel 5 gallon Sceptor/Jerry cans for the past 10 years). I'm about fed up trying to find a spot for the 40lbs of fuel and always worry about it. In 10 years I've never once needed a drop of the extra 5 gallons and it has always seemed to be such a hassle and headache to worry about the fuel. But I've always carried the spare fuel, shovel, axe, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, snacks, water, and sleeping bag. 99% of my travels are on the East Coast; North Carolina to Maine. I even have a ridiculously small fuel tank capacity (13 gallons) with a meager road range of 225 miles and predictably less off road in 4 wheel drive 1999 4Runner. I'm always conscious of my fuel levels and can usually pick out/plan out a fuel stop before 1/4 tank.

I've started looking at different fuel jug options for something that will fit my needs better. Which leads me down the road of asking myself if I really need to carry spare fuel. Maybe fuel stations are more frequent these days on the crowded east coast.
 

Sleeping Dog

Adventurer
In the east it is difficult to be further than 100 miles from fuel, the exceptions being the Trans Labrador Highway and and James Bay.

Jim
 

Outdooraholic

Adventurer
I think you answered your own question. If you've never used it in 10 years, and you know your fuel range and plan accordingly, then there is no need to lug extra fuel around.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
On the east coast "range anxiety" shouldn't be a big issue. If it is something that bothers you then sure, carry that extra 5 gallons. I always carried an extra 15 in my Defender 110 and ran it dry on a pretty regular basis because of the stupid small tank.

Now that I've pushed my cruising range out to about 1000 miles the concern becomes more one of how much diesel I can afford to pump. :)
 

7echo

Adventurer
One of the downsides to the 3rd gen T4R. The tanks are, I think, 18.5 gallons capacity. When the light comes on in mine, at about 200 miles, I will go another 25 +/- miles. When I fill up it kicks off the pump at approx 14.5 gallons, then I put another 1 gallon in and stop. Lots of talking about adding fuel cells and such on T4R.org but not a lot of solutions other than a can or 2 mounted on the back.


When the weather cools down(like December, lol) I am going to pull a tank from under a junked 4Runner in the salvage yard. I want to see if there is room to have a custom tank fabbed with more capacity that will fit in the OEM loction and use the OEM filler neck.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
One of the downsides to the 3rd gen T4R. The tanks are, I think, 18.5 gallons capacity. When the light comes on in mine, at about 200 miles, I will go another 25 +/- miles. When I fill up it kicks off the pump at approx 14.5 gallons, then I put another 1 gallon in and stop. Lots of talking about adding fuel cells and such on T4R.org but not a lot of solutions other than a can or 2 mounted on the back.


When the weather cools down(like December, lol) I am going to pull a tank from under a junked 4Runner in the salvage yard. I want to see if there is room to have a custom tank fabbed with more capacity that will fit in the OEM loction and use the OEM filler neck.

Take cardboard and duct tape with you to the junk yard - best way to test the theory is "make" the biggest cardboard replica tank you can and then do the math to figure out the capacity.

Good luck!
 
I recently upgraded my Bronco fuel tank from 20 gallon to 33 gallons. There use to be someone that made a 45 gallon tank but refuses to make them unless he has orders for 6 or more. At 10mpg I needed to increase my range. I still plan on carrying 3 maybe 4 cans depends on what I can fit on the new tire rack. I have run into situations where someone else on a trail has run out of fuel not because they were completely out, but because of the angle the vehicle was sitting. Carrying extra fuel maybe not always be for your use but helping out someone else in need.
 

SnoViking

Adventurer
One of the downsides to the 3rd gen T4R. The tanks are, I think, 18.5 gallons capacity. When the light comes on in mine, at about 200 miles, I will go another 25 +/- miles. When I fill up it kicks off the pump at approx 14.5 gallons, then I put another 1 gallon in and stop. Lots of talking about adding fuel cells and such on T4R.org but not a lot of solutions other than a can or 2 mounted on the back.

You are correct; it's an 18.5 gallon tank but because of the vent tube design you can only put about 15 gallons total (from dry). There's a few people who have talked about modifying (shortening) the vent tube to gain a few extra gallons. Once I start hearing reports back I'll decide if I want to go through the hassle of dropping and opening up my fuel tank for the modification
 

proper4wd

Expedition Leader
The only time I have carried extra fuel in the Northeast was in the North Maine Woods (15 gallons).
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
USA Population Density Map

648px-United_States_Population_Density.svg.png
 

digitaldelay

Explorer
That's crazy how defined the vertical line between Fargo and Corpus Cristi (?) is. Perfectly in the center of the country, too.

Jason

Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk
 

fireball

Explorer
I carry about 2 gallons in a 5 gallon jerry can on our trailer. It keeps me from worrying. I can't see a need to lug around any more than that.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
That's crazy how defined the vertical line between Fargo and Corpus Cristi (?) is. Perfectly in the center of the country, too.

Jason

Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk

Bet it matches an annual precipitation map. It's well east of the front slop of the Rockies, too.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
186,185
Messages
2,883,037
Members
226,050
Latest member
Breezy78
Top