The Anatomy of an overland Land Rover

zeroland

Adventurer
Nick, from Langebaan Sunset blog, recently wrote an article on the upgrades he did to his Defender 300Tdi post his trans-Africa trip. He titled it 'The Anatomy of a Land Rover'
overland+vehicle+land+rover+2.0.jpg


I thought it was a great concept so have searched the archives for old photos of my Series II and have created 'The Anatomy of a Land Rover Series II'
Slide9.JPG


Next up will be my Defender 200Tdi... followed by my Discovery 300Tdi


Anyone else fancy adding a few labels to photos and sharing 'The anatomy of an overland vehicle'?

Cheers,
Martin
 

RMP&O

Expedition Leader
I always wondered why people would put a padlock hasp on doors. I also wonder why they would put grates or lockable panels over rear windows.

The reason I wonder why is because all somebody has to do to break into the truck after the "security" measures is toss a rock through the door windows or windshield.
 

PhyrraM

Adventurer
My dad used to use the phrase "To keep honest people honest" usually followed with "Not much will stop a truely dishonest person".
 

zeroland

Adventurer
A seed net is used to prevent grass seeds clogging up the radiator when travelling on very remote overgrown tracks.
 

LR Max

Local Oaf
Anatomy of an overland LR...should be a photo of your AAA card.

Used mine this weekend! Also should include a nice place for you to relax while you wait an hour for the rollback to come pick you up.
 

Antichrist

Expedition Leader
I always wondered why people would put a padlock hasp on doors. I also wonder why they would put grates or lockable panels over rear windows.

The reason I wonder why is because all somebody has to do to break into the truck after the "security" measures is toss a rock through the door windows or windshield.
Probably because it's harder to climb in through the windscreen, particularly on a Series. Also, for the rear windows there's often a lot of booty within arms reach, not so much (that isn't fastened down) reaching through the windscreen.
The stock door locks are definitely of the "to keep honest people honest" type.

A seed net is used to prevent grass seeds clogging up the radiator when travelling on very remote overgrown tracks.
Similar principle, though probably more effective, as the chaff guard that was an option on series Rovers.
 

David Harris

Expedition Leader
Anatomy of an overland LR...should be a photo of your AAA card.

Used mine this weekend! Also should include a nice place for you to relax while you wait an hour for the rollback to come pick you up.

What vehicle broke and what was wrong?

I have AAA but have only used it when the fuel pump failed on one of my D1's. I try to bring the necessary tools and a few spares to fix whatever goes wrong myself.

David
 

maxingout

Adventurer
Nice photos and links. I always enjoy seeing how people prepare their vehicles for expeditionary travel. All the trucks pictured have lots of great modifications. More good ideas for my own vehicles.
 

overlander

Expedition Leader
I always wondered why people would put a padlock hasp on doors. I also wonder why they would put grates or lockable panels over rear windows.

The reason I wonder why is because all somebody has to do to break into the truck after the "security" measures is toss a rock through the door windows or windshield.

What is done here is to put the security grills on the rear side sliding windows, the rear door and rear quarter glass, and then install a full length steel dog guard separating the middle row from the rear compartment. This creates a security area in the rear cargo area for all the valuables and provisions for a trip. going through the windshield or door glass would still require getting through the dog guard to access the goodies. A steel Tuffy console upfront and you have yourself a pretty secure vehicle that will not be the lowest hanging fruit for thieves.
 

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