Minimum Equipment List JKU

jourdan

Member
Is this the right setup from 67D?


-J
 

m(a)ce

Adventurer
congrats on the new Jeep!

lots of good advice above.

-as mentioned definitely get a fire extinguisher -
I like the compact nature of the Elements one.

-double check the quality and age/wear on the recovery gear that came with the Jeep. if you’re not experienced in using the recovery gear get properly trained - there are more opportunities than ever to learn the safe way. and if anything is worn at all I’d start fresh with quality kit for a piece of mind.

-trail comms: I’d recommend GMRS (over CB) but check with those you adventure with. Ham is another solid choice. I’ve had a couple Midland GMRS radios and they’ve been solid.

-tire accessories: a deflator is nice (lots of options) and a tire repair kit is well worth it too (they’re small and light; ARB one is decent).

-as mentioned check the factory jack is in proper working order. add to that the AEV jack base- I like it’s compact & functional nature.

-storage options: I stash a lot of my gear in Blue Ridge Overland bags/pouches/etc - they’re layout works for me and they’re handmade in VA. If you need more lockable storage check out Goose Gear. In my old JK I ran a Goose Gear setup and the side cubbies and drawers helped keep gear organized, accessible and out of sight.

hope you enjoy the Jeep!


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ChasingOurTrunks

Well-known member
Lots of good advice, but a "must have" for me that I've not seen mentioned is a way to read trouble codes.

The 3.6 L has a few sneaky sensors that can fail, and they aren't horrible if they do, but knowing the difference between a CEL that you can drive on and one that should warrant a look right away can be important on a trip. For instance, there's an oil pressure sensor that failed a few times on mine. Apparently, this sensor switches between "high pressure" and "low pressure" oil pumping, depending on what the computer tells it to do. If it fails, it defaults to "high pressure", which I understand has basically zero detrimental effects. But, you wouldn't know that unless you had a code reader. It's a big job to fix trailside, and so I wouldn't bother bringing a spare sensor, but I would want to check the codes every day to make sure that was the only problem my vehicle had. If the CEL is on and stays on because of a minor fault, it can mask a stack of other, potentially more major faults behind it, so checking every day can be a way of getting a bit more information to know the true vehicle status.

Perhaps a bit out of scope for the tool kit, but if going really remote (no internet) you may need to also have a code guide, though some readers provide this info for you in general terms. I use a Bluetooth-enabled $20 dongle from amazon paired to a Smart Phone.
 

Jupiter58

Well-known member
Lots of good advice, but a "must have" for me that I've not seen mentioned is a way to read trouble codes.

The 3.6 L has a few sneaky sensors that can fail, and they aren't horrible if they do, but knowing the difference between a CEL that you can drive on and one that should warrant a look right away can be important on a trip. For instance, there's an oil pressure sensor that failed a few times on mine. Apparently, this sensor switches between "high pressure" and "low pressure" oil pumping, depending on what the computer tells it to do. If it fails, it defaults to "high pressure", which I understand has basically zero detrimental effects. But, you wouldn't know that unless you had a code reader. It's a big job to fix trailside, and so I wouldn't bother bringing a spare sensor, but I would want to check the codes every day to make sure that was the only problem my vehicle had. If the CEL is on and stays on because of a minor fault, it can mask a stack of other, potentially more major faults behind it, so checking every day can be a way of getting a bit more information to know the true vehicle status.

Perhaps a bit out of scope for the tool kit, but if going really remote (no internet) you may need to also have a code guide, though some readers provide this info for you in general terms. I use a Bluetooth-enabled $20 dongle from amazon paired to a Smart Phone.

100% on the code reader. I like the OBD JScan app for the phone also. Allows you to set up drls, tire size, code reader, etc and read anything the OBD can.
 

SBSYNCRO

Well-known member
I’m pressed for time so I’ll make a brief list and come back for more later.

1. I applaud the effort and desire to compile and share a list.

2. I carry too much crap. But I pay attention to the things I use most often. They are:

-air compressor, deflator, and air chuck

- tire plug kit and Colby valve stem replacements

- gloves

- zip ties and gorilla tape

- NOCO battery booster. (I have tested 5 or 6 different brands and the NOCO is far and away the best)

- Compact lug wrench that doubles as socket wrench handle extension


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

86scotty

Cynic
www.67d.com Awesome US made products. I have been using there phone mount for years. Zero shake with there solid ball mounts. Unlike the rubber coated competitors.

I'm a 67designs fan as well but recently needed a mount for my new JLU and they were out of stock. I went with a newer competitor called Bulletpoint. I'm pretty impressed. A bit cheaper and the quality is on par.
 

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