OVRLND CAMPERS ONLY : Post your OVRLND Camper build here or a link to your build thread to inspire others!

Pra4sno

Member
For those with the standard mill aluminum siding, how has it been holding up over time? Would you go back and get an anodized product instead?
 

dstefan

Well-known member
I can’t speak to the siding, as I do have the anodized. However, all the non-anodized mill aluminum corners and window frames (edit; and roof) are standing up very well - no corrosion.

I think there’s two things at least that make the anodized a good choice. First, it’s just not as bright and shiny. When the sun’s shining on the camper it’s pretty reflective in general and the mill aluminum is more so. anodized sort of dampens that reflectivity down a bit.

The other advantage I see in the anodized is that it doesn’t scratch as badly as the mill aluminum. I end up on some pretty narrow brushy, thorny trails and the anodized really doesn’t look at all scratched, but I can see scratches on some of the mill aluminum.

Jay recommended a product called AlumaGuard which I have used a couple times over the 2 1/2 years. I’ve had the camper in service. I guess it helps?
 
Last edited:

Pra4sno

Member
Appreciate the feedback! I'm hoping I can throw my build sheet out here along with my thoughts and collect some OVRLND owner feedback from those who have had their camper awhile.

Going on a 2.5 Gen 6.5ft bed double cab Tundra (2015)

USE CASE:
We have had a tear drop camper, slept in the back of our land cruiser, and tent camped for about a decade. Going to this accomplishes being self contained and not having to worry about towing, have standing room/more interior comfort, and the option to customize over time while also having minor improvements in security for places with more wildlife. I do more endurance based activities where my wife is the support vehicle, so her having a secure place she can base camp out of and have me stop by is helpful. Much of our use is in shoulder seasons when temps are swinging from 50-80 degrees down to 15-30 at night, so saving some $ for insulation and heat is high on our list - as well as keeping our setup to where we can insulate and keep thermal bridging down a bit.

Current build sheet: rear barn door halves; passenger side flip up hatch, Maxxfan (4 speed exhausting), Gas lift struts and clear vinyl windows, regular cabover height.

Couple of areas we are thinking hard about:

1. Rear hatch vs barn doors. I get that the barn doors are the more popular option, but the flip up tailgate seems easier to use when we need to haul materials or paddleboards/etc. as well as just easier to use in general? Pop two latches and swing it up. The barn doors are appealing as you can attach accessories to them, but if you do, then you can't latch them open and they are swinging freely. Obviously our wind out here wreaks havoc on objects that can "swing". It SEEMS from testing at the expo that the barn doors are more work to close up, to open (just more steps to use generally). Really interested in better thinking through this one. We have had vehicles with rear swingout tire carriers, etc. in the past and it really got tiring with how much we go in and out.

2. Flip up hatches on BOTH sides vs just the passenger. I'm conflicted as I like the quick access to the drivers side, but know that the passenger being "curb side" will get more use.

3. Cabover height. I'm 6'1" and sitting in their camper at the expo it seemed like plenty of room. Would rather get better mileage and have a better wind profile overall when driving due to the high winds we have in our area, and having seen the 10" cabover in person I prefer the aesthetic. What is the AF cabover?

4. Front slider window in cab. I know I'd like to get ventilation from that protected area between the cab and the truck. Its an expensive way to get ventilation. Am contemplating going without and just adding a small slider window if we really want it. It seems like a prime area for water ingress, loads of thermal transfer, loss of privacy, and I don't plan on windows on the back of the camper so no need to "see through". I've had truck toppers before and know that dust and grime build up on these windows also makes them effectively useless.

5. Roof Rack. This seems like one of the more annoying things to install later. I don't anticipate hauling anything up that high.

Obviously the costs are adding up quickly and after factoring taxes we're back in the camp of trying to figure out if we are sane; or if we could buy a used 4WC or should just get back into a teardrop again and deal with towing.

Some photos to keep things interesting from fly fishing and recent trail runs.

PXL_20220716_144917516.jpgPXL_20220806_231443944.jpgPXL_20220916_190915961.jpg
 
Last edited:

montechie

Active member
1. Rear hatch vs barn doors.
I really appreciate the barn doors after having a hatch in various Leer caps. I've hauled things locally with the barn doors latched open and it's nicer than trying to secure a hatch to prevent bouncing/breaking over bumps etc. You do lose a little rain shelter for the tailgate though. I don't notice any additional hassle opening/closing the barn doors once I got used to them. I'm not carrying anything on mine yet, but was planning on just extending the latches with straps and calling it done.
2. Flip up hatches on BOTH sides vs just the passenger. I'm conflicted as I like the quick access to the drivers side, but know that the passenger being "curb side" will get more use.
I'm constantly using both, I also frequently hauling mountain bikes inside so I use the hatches to either reach the front of my bikes for attaching/detaching, or accessing the bed when I have a single bike in front of the other hatch. For camping I built a removable shelf that's level with one hatch so I can move things in and out while cooking. They're one of my favorite features, so much more usable than past toppers. Without 1 or both hatches it would be much easier to insulate. The struts and extra structure makes it a little more difficult to insulate, but we have Terns in ours so that's part of the complexity.
4. Front slider window in cab. I know I'd like to get ventilation from that protected area between the cab and the truck. Its an expensive way to get ventilation. Am contemplating going without and just adding a small slider window if we really want it. It seems like a prime area for water ingress, loads of thermal transfer, loss of privacy, and I don't plan on windows on the back of the camper so no need to "see through". I've had truck toppers before and know that dust and grime build up on these windows also makes them effectively useless.
I'm mixed on having ours. I do use it for a little for visibility (+ windows in the barn doors), especially to spot tree limbs etc. I also use it for sheltered ventilation, although you aren't going to get much circulation without a little fan. We've had no water ingress in over a year of torrential rainstorms, snow storms, car washes etc. Privacy loss is minor if you put a window shade in your truck window, the camper window is a little tinted. It also doesn't stay as dirty as past fiberglass toppers, it's way easier to get with a car wash sprayer since the gap is more accessible than a formed fiberglass cap. Definitely less warm than just having an insulated wall, we hang a thick blanket over it though. I've done about ~0F in the camper...
5. Roof Rack. This seems like one of the more annoying things to install later. I don't anticipate hauling anything up that high.
Obviously the costs are adding up quickly and after factoring taxes we're back in the camp of trying to figure out if we are sane; or if we could buy a used 4WC or should just get back into a teardrop again and deal with towing.
I got the roof tracks and only occasionally use them, sort of. Even with my short 5' bed my skis fit in the back easily, you get so much more usable vertical space with these toppers. I also keep my recovery gear inside 90% of the time. That being said, I used extruded aluminum bars to create a cheap Prinsu style rack and it's been excellent for protecting the plastic cover of the rooftop fan from tree limbs, not to mention saving my roof. I also carry skis, maxxtracks and my shovel up there for longer camping trips to keep potentially wet/muddy things out of the sleeping area. Some of that you could easily create a mount to the side of your longer camper. Personally I'm glad to not have to install the tracks, and I've done other mods fine. I'm also planning on using mine to easily mount solar in the future.

You're going to love the camper, putting it on a 6.5' bed is going to feel huge and a Tundra won't even notice it. I can't believe how much space it adds to my little 5' Gladiator bed. It's also very usable with the top down because the closed height is still pretty high. There's a ton you can do for insulation, most use the foam core stuff, I used Havelock wool which I've loved. I would just recommend using the camper for a bit to decide where you're going to bolt/customize things before adding insulation.
 

Pra4sno

Member
I really appreciate the barn doors after having a hatch in various Leer caps. I've hauled things locally with the barn doors latched open and it's nicer than trying to secure a hatch to prevent bouncing/breaking over bumps etc. You do lose a little rain shelter for the tailgate though. I don't notice any additional hassle opening/closing the barn doors once I got used to them. I'm not carrying anything on mine yet, but was planning on just extending the latches with straps and calling it done.

I'm constantly using both, I also frequently hauling mountain bikes inside so I use the hatches to either reach the front of my bikes for attaching/detaching, or accessing the bed when I have a single bike in front of the other hatch. For camping I built a removable shelf that's level with one hatch so I can move things in and out while cooking. They're one of my favorite features, so much more usable than past toppers. Without 1 or both hatches it would be much easier to insulate. The struts and extra structure makes it a little more difficult to insulate, but we have Terns in ours so that's part of the complexity.

I'm mixed on having ours. I do use it for a little for visibility (+ windows in the barn doors), especially to spot tree limbs etc. I also use it for sheltered ventilation, although you aren't going to get much circulation without a little fan. We've had no water ingress in over a year of torrential rainstorms, snow storms, car washes etc. Privacy loss is minor if you put a window shade in your truck window, the camper window is a little tinted. It also doesn't stay as dirty as past fiberglass toppers, it's way easier to get with a car wash sprayer since the gap is more accessible than a formed fiberglass cap. Definitely less warm than just having an insulated wall, we hang a thick blanket over it though. I've done about ~0F in the camper...

I got the roof tracks and only occasionally use them, sort of. Even with my short 5' bed my skis fit in the back easily, you get so much more usable vertical space with these toppers. I also keep my recovery gear inside 90% of the time. That being said, I used extruded aluminum bars to create a cheap Prinsu style rack and it's been excellent for protecting the plastic cover of the rooftop fan from tree limbs, not to mention saving my roof. I also carry skis, maxxtracks and my shovel up there for longer camping trips to keep potentially wet/muddy things out of the sleeping area. Some of that you could easily create a mount to the side of your longer camper. Personally I'm glad to not have to install the tracks, and I've done other mods fine. I'm also planning on using mine to easily mount solar in the future.

You're going to love the camper, putting it on a 6.5' bed is going to feel huge and a Tundra won't even notice it. I can't believe how much space it adds to my little 5' Gladiator bed. It's also very usable with the top down because the closed height is still pretty high. There's a ton you can do for insulation, most use the foam core stuff, I used Havelock wool which I've loved. I would just recommend using the camper for a bit to decide where you're going to bolt/customize things before adding insulation.

Thanks for the feedback! Did you go with extra cab height or standard?

Great notes on the rear window; I'll have to think more about that one and evaluate how we use it. Really helpful too to think about the use of the roof tracks. I will likely just throw skis in the bed; but may rig up a rack on the side of the camper. Climbing up to the roof seems to be a pain; although the barn doors would make that dramatically easier when the roof is down. Certainly another reason for them.

Is your camper anodized or mill aluminum?
 

dirtnsmores

Member
I'm putting my double cab long bed Tacoma up for sale, and I recently purchased a 2006 Toyota Tundra double cab. I've been looking at these for a few years and finally pulled the trigger. My kids are getting bigger, so it was getting tight in the Tacoma. And I decided I want to put a camper similar to these on the back of my truck and sell our pop-up trailer camper. Tired of towing. I'm pretty excited about this setup and going through all these pages, makes me super stoked to be able to customize the interior how I want. Often. I just take one of my kids on short weekend trips in Southern California, but about three times a year we will be going on long trips as an entire family. If I need more space, I'll just throw my gazelle tent in the back. But honestly, I think I can make it work with one of these campers. Now to figure out what kind of add-ons I want. You're right, it does add up quickly. Can the fan be running while the truck is moving? I plan to keep my dog back there when it's not super hot while they're traveling, in her crate of course, and I'm hoping that side vented windows, a fan running, and possibly my cab opened up to push cold air into the camper will be enough to keep it tolerable for her. On hot days. I'll just bring her in the cab with us and deal with the hair
 

dstefan

Well-known member
1. Rear hatch vs barn doors
Love the barn doors. No harder to open and close one than a hatch with two latches. The hatch does give you some cover, but we have a rear 180º awning which makes the tailgate like a covered porch. Wouldn’t be without either.

One door has the latches and the other has the interior slider. It’s worth thinking about which side you want to have the external latches on (Jay will ask you — it caught me by surprise). That door is the quick access one to reach in to flip a switch for lights or pop up your fridge or cooler, if you have it at the tailgate. Opening both doors is a little moreeffort, but really you get used to it quickly and it won’t annoy you the way a hatch can getting in and out on the tailgate. Plus you can’t stand on the TG to reach the roof, or get a higher line of sight without opening and closing and then opening and closing the hatch when your done on the TG.

IF you don’t want stuff hanging on the sides of your camper to catch brush and further ruin the highway aerodynamics, then the BDs are functional for installing stuff on. I got one door reinforced with a third hinge as an option and I hang my Trasharoo on an 8020 rack. I also carry 5 gallons of gas in it when needed. The door handles it fine. I also have propane mount for the other one. I struggled with how to fix the doors open straight out, and eventually put up a hinged stop on both that can bolt into the BD frame with thumb screws. Search my user name for this thread and you can see what I did. If I was doing it again, I’d do the same, but add the third hinge on both doors.


2. Flip up hatches on BOTH sides vs just the passenger
They are endlessly useful for reaching in for stuff to stop you from opening up the barn doors, dropping the tailgate and climbing in and out. I use both. And when it’s hot, they provide superior cross ventilation.

I kept a vertical open space on the Pside bulkhead where I store my fullsized Maxtraxx vertically fixed to the frame rail so I can pull them out through the hatch easily. BUT it depends on your interior layout. I later added some cabinet structure which means I use the Pside hatch a bit less and keeping the hatch (partially) clear dictated some of my cabinet dimensions differently. I second @Montchie (I think it was) on use it a bit to determine how to lay out the interior. Also, real CAD or Cardboard Aided Design is pretty worthwhile before building stuff in.
3. Cabover height
I got the extra 2” and love being able to sit up in bed when popped up and sit on my bedrail height bench seat with the top down. I don’t think that extra 2” does that much damage aerodynamically vs the total frontal area, the square corners and the square back, but at 6’3” it made a big difference inside.
4. Front slider window in cab.
Tough one. I went with a solid window to avoid leaks and provide a view out the back. Well, it doesn’t leak, except cold air and I can’t see out the back while driving regardless. It’s now insulated and paneled over. If I did it again, I’d either get a slider or nothing.

At times I’m sorry for getting the rear window in the Pside BD as we keep it covered for insulation and it makes putting stuff on the door harder, but we’ve had a couple of times recently where we were in a terrific thunder and lightning storm and rode it out with the top down and it really was great to see what was happening. Also, on a safety note, you can’t see what’s out the back when camped without one without opening a BD. I’d like to know what’s scratching at my door before I open it in bear country or around yahoos.
5. Roof Rack.
I didn’t want to be tempted to put anything up there to make it harder to open or close.

You didn’t ask, but I think the Positive Pressure Vent is real helpful if you are any on dusty roads, which you will be. Also, the 2nd Gen Tundra bed is a leaky sieve! I counted 30+ voids when I prepped it. If you have the factory bed rail (which Jay uses for the clamps) take it off to find a lot of the hidden holes and fill them with Butyl tape. I also really wish I’d pulled the plastic bedcaps to seal and shim them (they can ripple a bit with the weight of the camper). Diamondback (they make a really rugged tonneau type cover) sells a set of shims for Tundras. I really recommend you do that before your install.

@montechie is definitely right that you’ll have a huge amount of space on the 6.5 foot bed!
 

dstefan

Well-known member
Can the fan be running while the truck is moving?
I haven’t tried it, but I know I’ve read of one person on Expo who has done it with the vent lifted just slightly and with the fan on 3, I think he said, blowing in. I know there’s a fancier Max fan than the typical one Jay specs that has a remote and and is designed to be left open while underway. Has sort of shroud over it. I’m pretty sure Jay will install one if you ask for it and pay the higher cost.

I went from a Tacoma also. Think you’ll like the bigger platform. The 1st gens are a really nice balance of space without being too much larger than the 2nd gen Tacomas.
 

dirtnsmores

Member
I haven’t tried it, but I know I’ve read of one person on Expo who has done it with the vent lifted just slightly and with the fan on 3, I think he said, blowing in. I know there’s a fancier Max fan than the typical one Jay specs that has a remote and and is designed to be left open while underway. Has sort of shroud over it. I’m pretty sure Jay will install one if you ask for it and pay the higher cost.

I went from a Tacoma also. Think you’ll like the bigger platform. The 1st gens are a really nice balance of space without being too much larger than the 2nd gen Tacomas.

I just remembered you replied to me on the previous page. Thanks for all the insight! Yep that balance of size and space is why I wanted a first gen. So glad to have 4x4 now as well.

Working on the build sheet right now. Want a little extra bedding height, ventilation for the dog, flip up window for driver side, and barn hatch doors. Windows front and back. Roof tracks and solar hookups. It adds up real quick!
 

montechie

Active member
Thanks for the feedback! Did you go with extra cab height or standard?

Great notes on the rear window; I'll have to think more about that one and evaluate how we use it. Really helpful too to think about the use of the roof tracks. I will likely just throw skis in the bed; but may rig up a rack on the side of the camper. Climbing up to the roof seems to be a pain; although the barn doors would make that dramatically easier when the roof is down. Certainly another reason for them.

Is your camper anodized or mill aluminum?
I have the standard cab height. We're about maxed out when folding over the mattress (4" Megamat) + 25 degree double bag, but totally comfy with that setup. I appreciate the lower height when exploring, we scrape a lot on our forest tracks in the mountains.

We got the anodized aluminum, it looks great still without me doing much to maintain it. We get a lot of either sand, mag-chloride, or a wonderful slurry of both on the winter roads here.

That is one other benefit of the barn doors, accessing the roof from the tailgate is nicer without a hatch in the way. You could also always put a short stretch of L-track on your roof later if you find you want to mount something up there.
 

Pra4sno

Member
I have the standard cab height. We're about maxed out when folding over the mattress (4" Megamat) + 25 degree double bag, but totally comfy with that setup. I appreciate the lower height when exploring, we scrape a lot on our forest tracks in the mountains.

We got the anodized aluminum, it looks great still without me doing much to maintain it. We get a lot of either sand, mag-chloride, or a wonderful slurry of both on the winter roads here.

That is one other benefit of the barn doors, accessing the roof from the tailgate is nicer without a hatch in the way. You could also always put a short stretch of L-track on your roof later if you find you want to mount something up there.
Thanks for the help on this! Great to hear from someone with a similar use case.
 

Fergie

Expedition Leader
Finally getting around to posting some pics and updates of the camper here:


My wife and I just got back from three weeks on the road in the camper and it did just fine. Def have some changes to make, but that'll be minimal.
 

Phessor

Member
Appreciate the feedback! I'm hoping I can throw my build sheet out here along with my thoughts and collect some OVRLND owner feedback from those who have had their camper awhile.

Going on a 2.5 Gen 6.5ft bed double cab Tundra (2015)

USE CASE:
We have had a tear drop camper, slept in the back of our land cruiser, and tent camped for about a decade. Going to this accomplishes being self contained and not having to worry about towing, have standing room/more interior comfort, and the option to customize over time while also having minor improvements in security for places with more wildlife. I do more endurance based activities where my wife is the support vehicle, so her having a secure place she can base camp out of and have me stop by is helpful. Much of our use is in shoulder seasons when temps are swinging from 50-80 degrees down to 15-30 at night, so saving some $ for insulation and heat is high on our list - as well as keeping our setup to where we can insulate and keep thermal bridging down a bit.

Current build sheet: rear barn door halves; passenger side flip up hatch, Maxxfan (4 speed exhausting), Gas lift struts and clear vinyl windows, regular cabover height.

Couple of areas we are thinking hard about:

1. Rear hatch vs barn doors. I get that the barn doors are the more popular option, but the flip up tailgate seems easier to use when we need to haul materials or paddleboards/etc. as well as just easier to use in general? Pop two latches and swing it up. The barn doors are appealing as you can attach accessories to them, but if you do, then you can't latch them open and they are swinging freely. Obviously our wind out here wreaks havoc on objects that can "swing". It SEEMS from testing at the expo that the barn doors are more work to close up, to open (just more steps to use generally). Really interested in better thinking through this one. We have had vehicles with rear swingout tire carriers, etc. in the past and it really got tiring with how much we go in and out.
I chose the rear hatch over the barn doors because I have a swing out spare tire carrier that would be in the way.
2. Flip up hatches on BOTH sides vs just the passenger. I'm conflicted as I like the quick access to the drivers side, but know that the passenger being "curb side" will get more use.
I only went with one, but I am sure I will wished I had gone with both.
3. Cabover height. I'm 6'1" and sitting in their camper at the expo it seemed like plenty of room. Would rather get better mileage and have a better wind profile overall when driving due to the high winds we have in our area, and having seen the 10" cabover in person I prefer the aesthetic. What is the AF cabover?
I chose the standard height based on looks alone. Another choice I will probably regret.
4. Front slider window in cab. I know I'd like to get ventilation from that protected area between the cab and the truck. Its an expensive way to get ventilation. Am contemplating going without and just adding a small slider window if we really want it. It seems like a prime area for water ingress, loads of thermal transfer, loss of privacy, and I don't plan on windows on the back of the camper so no need to "see through". I've had truck toppers before and know that dust and grime build up on these windows also makes them effectively useless.
I chose not to get a front slider, I installed one on my current topper and I have never used it for it's intended purpose.
5. Roof Rack. This seems like one of the more annoying things to install later. I don't anticipate hauling anything up that high.
I felt it would be to much of a pain attaching and removing items from my roof.
Obviously the costs are adding up quickly and after factoring taxes we're back in the camp of trying to figure out if we are sane; or if we could buy a used 4WC or should just get back into a teardrop again and deal with towing.
And it does add up quickly.
 

Pra4sno

Member
Awesome, appreciate all of the comments on this! We ended up going with both side hatches, rear barn doors, front slider window, maxxfan (exhaust only), windows and struts; with mill aluminum siding.

Things we may still add are interior locking latches on the side hatches, and anodized exterior.
 

dirtnsmores

Member
Yeah, I'm already impressed with how it feels on some of the trails, mud, and snow I went on for my return trip. Or rather how the camper doesn't feel, I didn't notice a performance difference with the extra weight and the Gladiator is already way more nimble and capable than the DCLB Tacoma it replaced.

We are planning on doing some basic insulation with wool (Havloc) in the gaps and ceiling, haven't decided how we want to cover the walls yet. We've thought about using canvas or something similar, but anything we do needs to standup to regular gear hauling bed abuse. After the insulation I want to see what heat we need, we already have winter tent camped for decades in Montana winters, so have some pretty toasty sleeping gear. I'm hoping a small electric heater before bed and before getting up will be all the glamping we need. ;)

The topper is going to see a lot of normal use as a mountain bike hauler and weekly trail runner, so no extensive bed builds are planned and our camp setup is pretty simple, usually shared with our '05 LJ. Anything in the bed has to be able to take an occasional hit from bike handles, pedals, chains, etc. Eventually I have thoughts on a removable shelf setup for cooking, work and storage on longer trips, but want to live with the topper/truck for awhile.

I'm curious to see how yours evolved. Did you add any semi-permanent furniture or kitchen stuff?
 

Forum statistics

Threads
186,275
Messages
2,883,982
Members
226,151
Latest member
Dgollman
Top