Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

taugust

Adventurer
Here is another project. Webbing wrap and handle for my old camp table. The Cabelas table has the legs integrated, and the elastic that held everything together failed long ago. I have been using a bungee to hold it together, but it takes 2 hands to carry and I don't like to use the bag. So, quick attach side-release buckles hold it together and a handle makes it easy one hand carry. The handle is more from the repurposed Jeep grab handles. 1.5" nylon webbing.20230113_180137.jpg20230113_180221.jpg20230113_180421.jpg
 
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ITTOG

Well-known member
Anyone know if a JUKI DDL-8700 INDUSTRIAL Lockstitch Sewing Machine, Table, and Servo be good enough to build the canvas with windows for a pop top camper? The windows would require it to be able to stitch through canvas, mesh, vinyl window, and canvas all at once.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Anyone know if a JUKI DDL-8700 INDUSTRIAL Lockstitch Sewing Machine, Table, and Servo be good enough to build the canvas with windows for a pop top camper? The windows would require it to be able to stitch through canvas, mesh, vinyl window, and canvas all at once.

So, thats a high speed (5000spm), manufacturing, garment machine. While it's an industrial machine, and it most likely could punch through all that material, the challenge will be keeping it slow enough for slow detail work or from over running the seam. I've heard guys putting larger pulleys and adjustable servo motors on them to slow them down. For example my JUKI 1541 is only 2500spm and I slow it down to maybe 1000spm for detail and control when dealing with big pieces or bulky canvas pieces.

Hope that helps. Good luck!
 

williaty

Member
Anyone know if a JUKI DDL-8700 INDUSTRIAL Lockstitch Sewing Machine, Table, and Servo be good enough to build the canvas with windows for a pop top camper? The windows would require it to be able to stitch through canvas, mesh, vinyl window, and canvas all at once.
I have one. It would *possibly* do it, but it'd be a damned miserable experience. I'm actually confident it'd stab through all that. Industrial machines of any type never lack for stabbing power. However, I'm just as confident that getting it to feed all that material evenly would be a nightmare. Just given the bulk and constitution of what you're talking about, no drop-feed only machine is going to be fun to try that on. Could someone with a lot of expernence force it to happen just to prove a point? Yeah, probably. No one would want to sew a whole camper's worth of windows with it if they had any possible alternative. Regarding the other poster's comment about speed: With the Juki computerized brain-box/motor combo, 2-stitches-per-second slow speed sewing is excellent and you can still get the full 5500spm just by flooring it.. With a servo motor and a 45mm pulley, slow speed sewing would be good enough. You'd lose the top end that no one outside a factory uses but you'd be back down to a 2-stitch-per-second low end. Where you could easily get into trouble is if you found one with a clutch motor and a larger (100mm or bigger) pulley on it.

I'd MUCH prefer to sew a project like that on a compound-feed machine like my Consew 206RB-5 (or any other compound feed machine). It would just take a lot less work, a lot less cussing, and be more likely to go right on the first try.
 

ITTOG

Well-known member
Given I have never sewed I probably need about 15 spm.

Thanks for the feedback, I will keep looking.

Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk
 

PCO6

Adventurer
Here is another project. Webbing wrap and handle for my old camp table. The Cabelas table has the legs integrated, and the elastic that held everything together failed long ago. I have been using a bungee to hold it together, but it takes 2 hands to carry and I don't like to use the bag. So, quick attach side-release buckles hold it together and a handle makes it easy one hand carry. The handle is more from the repurposed Jeep grab handles. 1.5" nylon webbing.View attachment 760727View attachment 760728View attachment 760729

Nice job and very practical. (y) Sewing is on my list of "things to learn". Not that I've mastered it but I have made a few things out of paracord. Like with panel beating metal, I can usually make one of anything. Making a second one to match is the hard part. :giggle: I was having trouble making things the same length so I came up with a simple jig. It's basically 2 pieces of angle iron and 2 eye bolts that I attach to my welding table. It's very adjustable, speeds up the process and works great.

Jig - Paracord.jpg
 

taugust

Adventurer
Anyone know if a JUKI DDL-8700 INDUSTRIAL Lockstitch Sewing Machine, Table, and Servo be good enough to build the canvas with windows for a pop top camper? The windows would require it to be able to stitch through canvas, mesh, vinyl window, and canvas all at once.

You might look for a used Sailrite LSZ-1 zig zag or LS-1 straight stitch machine. They are walking foot machines and designed to do this sort of work. They can be found used locally sometimes, depending on where you are. There is a Sailrite users group on FB that periodically has machines posted for sale. There have been a few recently. They have good low speed capabilities, and if they have the Worker B power pack, they can be very slow. I recently bought an LS-1 and then added the Worker B, and it is perfect for this newb.
 

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BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
You might look for a used Sailrite LSZ-1 zig zag or LS-1 straight stitch machine. They are walking foot machines and designed to do this sort of work. They can be found used locally sometimes, depending on where you are. There is a Sailrite users group on FB that periodically has machines posted for sale. There have been a few recently. They have good low speed capabilities, and if they have the Worker B power pack, they can be very slow. I recently bought an LS-1 and then added the Worker B, and it is perfect for this newb.

Good looking machine! Have fun!
 

ITTOG

Well-known member
You might look for a used Sailrite LSZ-1 zig zag or LS-1 straight stitch machine. They are walking foot machines and designed to do this sort of work. They can be found used locally sometimes, depending on where you are. There is a Sailrite users group on FB that periodically has machines posted for sale. There have been a few recently. They have good low speed capabilities, and if they have the Worker B power pack, they can be very slow. I recently bought an LS-1 and then added the Worker B, and it is perfect for this newb.
I am not sure what you call it on a sewing machine but what is the distance from the needle to the vertical arm. For clamps it is called the throat. It just looks pretty short and not sure if there is enough room for excess fabric.
 

williaty

Member
I am not sure what you call it on a sewing machine but what is the distance from the needle to the vertical arm. For clamps it is called the throat. It just looks pretty short and not sure if there is enough room for excess fabric.
Either "harp space" or "distance to the right of the needle".

Yes, the Ultrafeed machines have a VERY small harp space. I personally couldn't deal with it but then again I'm spoiled by full sized industrial machines.
 

alexcivick

Observer
I’ve been wanting to make a zippered case for my Kermit Chair for a while cause I’m not a fan of the one it came with so I decided to break out my old Thompson Mini Walking Foot for a project. My industrial machines are tensioned for heavier material like leather so I have a couple of these portable machines for the occasional lighter canvas stuff. I love this machine.
I had some 500 denier waterproof canvas that is close in color to my chair. Originally I was going to match the cover I made for my Snow Peak table and add leather piping but opted to keep it simple since it’s been a while since I’ve used a machine with an electric motor and pedal. I also added a little too much wiggle room when I made the pattern as it can probably hold 2 Kermit Chairs but maybe that’s an excuse to buy another one. I used webbing for a top handle with some Molle loops (which will never get used) and an adjustable sling strap with buckle so I can strap it down to a rack or something if needed and a hanging loop. I salvaged the Kermit Chair sew-in label from the original bag and used some camo binding tape that I had for some reason. I also salvaged the double zipper from an old ripped up canopy bag so this whole project was made with scrap material.
I like this bag much more than the original even love the size although I wish I had added some padding to stabilize the canvas a little more. I made this real quick one morning so I could take it with me on a family trip to Colorado this past weekend and it worked great. So much easier and convenient to pack/unpack the chair with this zippered case than trying to cram it into the sleeve it came with.
I’m slowly making new cases for most of my Snow Peak IGT gear so ideally I’ll be posting more here
c8bf60c3f03dffe045401ca5774f6a9a.jpg

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24a442d68d7c8af1ac2225edff407456.jpg

d5fd5c9b207b8e0f93f44c3d10bf123b.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
I’ve been wanting to make a zippered case for my Kermit Chair for a while cause I’m not a fan of the one it came with so I decided to break out my old Thompson Mini Walking Foot for a project. My industrial machines are tensioned for heavier material like leather so I have a couple of these portable machines for the occasional lighter canvas stuff. I love this machine.
I had some 500 denier waterproof canvas that is close in color to my chair. Originally I was going to match the cover I made for my Snow Peak table and add leather piping but opted to keep it simple since it’s been a while since I’ve used a machine with an electric motor and pedal. I also added a little too much wiggle room when I made the pattern as it can probably hold 2 Kermit Chairs but maybe that’s an excuse to buy another one. I used webbing for a top handle with some Molle loops (which will never get used) and an adjustable sling strap with buckle so I can strap it down to a rack or something if needed and a hanging loop. I salvaged the Kermit Chair sew-in label from the original bag and used some camo binding tape that I had for some reason. I also salvaged the double zipper from an old ripped up canopy bag so this whole project was made with scrap material.
I like this bag much more than the original even love the size although I wish I had added some padding to stabilize the canvas a little more. I made this real quick one morning so I could take it with me on a family trip to Colorado this past weekend and it worked great. So much easier and convenient to pack/unpack the chair with this zippered case than trying to cram it into the sleeve it came with.
I’m slowly making new cases for most of my Snow Peak IGT gear so ideally I’ll be posting more here
c8bf60c3f03dffe045401ca5774f6a9a.jpg

34e905cecefa650198640c895b3c3380.jpg


24a442d68d7c8af1ac2225edff407456.jpg

d5fd5c9b207b8e0f93f44c3d10bf123b.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Great design and sew-out!
 

Louisd75

Adventurer
I am not sure what you call it on a sewing machine but what is the distance from the needle to the vertical arm. For clamps it is called the throat. It just looks pretty short and not sure if there is enough room for excess fabric.

There isn't a ton of room. I've been able to avoid the issue with careful planning, for the most part. It's better than our little household Brother machine. It is a compromise though, the smaller Sailrite machines are intended to be portable. While they are heavy to lug around, they are fairly compact. Plenty of times I wish I had a bigger machine until it's time to put it away.
 

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